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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    North Texas, USA
    Posts
    61

    Post

    Contacted the owner of a peach orchard the
    other day and to make a long story short,
    I received an invitation to place some hives on his land

    I'd like to hear of any major stumbling blocks
    anyone has experienced, or things that I need
    to watch out for in a situation like this.

    Forewarned is forelearned

    Thanks for your responses.
    “It is only as the intelligence of man moves along harmoniously with<br />the laws of Nature, that any improvement can be expected.”<br /><br />G. M. Doolittle

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    Peaches do not gain a great deal from honey bee pollination. Some orchard owners have unrealsitic elevated expectations. Know if he (or any neighboring orchards) spray and if so when. Even though no money changes hands have a contract stating you will be notified in a timely manner before any spraying and that the bees remain the property of the beekeeper. Look at the access roads and ask yourself if you will be able to get in easily after a spring rain the day before a spray to get the bees out. If he were to die or the property changes hands and no contract exists you may find yourself fighting to get your bees back. Bee sure the hives are in an isolated but truck accessible area to avoid orchard workers and visitors being stung. Spend at least one day in the Orchard during peak bloom on a beautiful spring day and take it all in. Trade some honey for peaches when the time comes!

    [size="1"][ November 23, 2005, 07:06 PM: Message edited by: Joel ][/size]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    hidalgo county texas
    Posts
    303

    Post

    i wouls suggest you do a search for sample pollination contracts to look over to be aware of what it entales.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Wetumpka ,Alabama
    Posts
    510

    Post

    Mark/brand your hives.When all is said and done and you want to remove your hives it would be nice to be able to show ownership if you need.And by all means get it in writing,when ,where,how long,what you'll do,not do,what he will do,not do.But most of all who is liable if someone is stung by them.I was always told to protect your own butt in whatever you do.That holds true more than anything else these days..
    Good luck.
    If you build it they will comb it.<br />Tim Rolan

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,288

    Post

    As mentioned a contract, specifying their responsibility to notify you of any spraying etc. and branding the hives will help some. Try to find out how much and how often and what they spray.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Montezuma, GA USA
    Posts
    69

    Post

    Forget the contract, don't put your bees out there. I'm from central Georgia, Macon County and Peach County. With no bees peaches already set more fruit than the tree can produce marketable peaches. They have to be picked off by hand to limit the drain on the tree and produce a descent peach. The stuff they spray to prevent the bugs from eating the young fruit will wipe out your bees. I have had to move my hives away when they were with in 1/4 mile of an orchard due to spraying during the bloom. Nothing ensures that the sprayer will be clean when they spray the fungicides either. Your hives will be healthier somewhere else. Try blackberry brambles.

    Best of luck.
    MECarden

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    I'll say it again....unless your being paid for pollination, there are always other much better places to have bees without dealing with spraying and other farm hassles. Farms/orchards that spray and mow are usually poor honey sites.

    If I was looking for honey sites for quality honey, not tainted by chemicals, and a multitude of flower sources for a good crop, orchards would be the last place I would be looking. They(farmers) will mow the dandelions and clover, use spray, and for the most part your bees will have to fly beyond the orchard for pollen and nectar as soon as the bloosom is over. And that won't last long. You could have many problems for 10 days of blossoms.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Edgefield County, South Carolina
    Posts
    646

    Post

    I am also in peach country. New to beekeeping but in our class our instructors said beware of peaches. The bloom is short, however sometimes spaced out, to allow for different crop timing. The peaches really don't really need bees for pollination. Also we were told the farmer was not suppose to spray during the bloom but the bees often have problems from spraying other times of the year because they go to the dandelion (etc.) beneath the trees.
    Joel, is right a beautiful sight in bloom- my problem is I live in an area where I am surrounded by peaches. I guess time will tell!!!
    sc-bee

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    North Texas, USA
    Posts
    61

    Post

    Ask and ye shall recieve

    I had a feeling and this was why I asked...

    I'm just a city boy who steps in cow pies
    when visiting a farm and ruins a good pair
    of sneakers.

    Sounds like, I'd have made a big investment
    and an even larger mistake.

    I guess I'll stick to my backyard for another
    year and keep looking for space to place a
    few hives with the rent paid in honey.

    Thanks! [img]smile.gif[/img]
    “It is only as the intelligence of man moves along harmoniously with<br />the laws of Nature, that any improvement can be expected.”<br /><br />G. M. Doolittle

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