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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Westerville, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    10

    Question

    I'm looking at buying a silver king electric uncapping knife...but see one for 120 volts & one for 220. I probably should now this...but what's the difference.

    I have 6 hives here in central Ohio...with about 400 lbs. of honey ready to extract but I want to get the right tool.

    Any tips would be appreciated.

    I'm a long time lurker on the bee forum...first time poster.

    Thanks
    Burt

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Jackson, Ga USA
    Posts
    146

    Cool

    The difference being - the 120 you can plug into any house outlet where as the 220 you have to have a plug in that is wired for 220 - like a clothes dryer plug in.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Hookstown PA USA
    Posts
    581

    Post

    220 is less expensive to operate. Worth it in my opinion. I chose 220 anytime I can.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    san antonio.texas USA
    Posts
    487

    Post

    I assume you are talking about a speed king electric knife. Unless you are wired for 220V in your uncapping area, I suggest the 110V. They both put out the same heat, the 110V just uses a bit more electricity and I believe less a shock hazzard. With 6 hives, the energy consumption difference is small. I prefer an electric knife with a control unit such as the kind Mann Lake carries. You can better control knife heat. A sharp unheated serrated knife works well also for just a few hives. Electric hand planes like the type Brushy Moutain carries work well once you get use to them and the elements are replaceable.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,543

    Question

    Soneone tell me how it is cheaper to operate at 220 than 110

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hotlanta, GA
    Posts
    475

    Post

    HM, cuz its volts, not watts You get charged for watt/hours(or kilowatt/hrs actually)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Post

    I=E/R and P=IE
    If both have a 110 Resistive load
    I=110/110 = 1 Amp and P=110 Watts
    I=220/110 = 2 Amps and P=440 Watts


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Montezuma, GA USA
    Posts
    69

    Post

    Don't buy either. I extracted 35 supers of clover and didn't even heat up the knife or the plane (Have both). You may not have a good way for the honey to drain out of the cappings and a scratcher doesn't remove as much honey. Looks like a many tined fork. Just stick it under the capings and flick them off.

    Mark

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,753

    Post

    I use the 120v electric knive with the thermostat in the blade. It gets too hot at first and always burns a bit of honey no matter how fast I work. Basically it starts too cold, goes to too hot and ends up just right while you're working steady.

    I've just bought a hackler honey punch. I haven't used it yet, but one advantage is that you don't get that burned taste in your honey. We'll see how well it extracts.

    I've tried a regular (non serrated) cold knife and it tore up the comb too much.

    I've considered the serrated cold knife from Brushy Mt. but Can't say how that would work.

    Until I try the Hackler Honey punch, I can't say I've found what I'm looking for yet in a knife. I'm sure the steam knives are wonderful, but who can afford that for a hobby?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Winnipeg Manitoba
    Posts
    311

    Post

    I dunno. I bought a honey punch last year, and it was the worst 80 bucks i ever spent.
    The concept is great, but I found that it took twice as long to extract and the combs never spun completly out. i started to break comb from having frames in the extractor for 40 min. Besides, I like making candles.

    John Russell

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Cornwall, Pa USA
    Posts
    91

    Post

    Here's the answer on the 220v versus 120v story. In a resistive heating element or similar load there is NO DIFFERENCE in power consumed and the 120V connection is easily found so DEFINITELY get the 120V item if one of these is what you are wanting. Where the 220v advantage comes in, is in other loads like motors, which we in the electrical field call "constant kva devices", in other words they will try and draw the same power(volts times amps) regardless of the voltage applied, and losses are a result of current(amp) draw. So end result is, a typical 120/240v single phase motor wired for 220v will draw HALF THE CURRENT (amps)for the same kva power usage, (double the voltage, halve the current to keep the kva the exact same) and so has much less resistive loss. So always wire a motor for the higher voltage if it is available. Your electric knife however doesn't care a lick what voltage it sees. Hope this helps. Can't believe my day job comes into play here at this site... have fun

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Cornwall, Pa USA
    Posts
    91

    Post

    Honey House, you wrote:
    "I=E/R and P=IE" (that's correct)
    "If both have a 110 Resistive load"

    But they wouldn't, they would be application specific with a desirable wattage, say 65 watts and not rated in resistance (ohms). You wouldn't just plug in a single resistance electric knife into one voltage or the other without burning it up at the higher voltage or being underpowered at the lower voltage. So the next statement goes in the wrong direction.
    "I=110/110 = 1 Amp and P=110 Watts"
    "I=220/110 = 2 Amps and P=440 Watts"

    For a 65 watt element at 120v, the current I=P/V, or current = 65/120, or about a half amp. For 220v 65 watt unit, the current is half that for 65 watts. Same power for similarly sized unit, just using different amount of current to get there, with no savings between one or the other. Now is this just as clear as mud?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,543
    Thank you Bill_newbee

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Gillett, Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    265

    Post

    i used my serrated bread knife from Pampered Chef, it worked great and i was able to cut off minimal cappings - a little bit hard to get the shallow spots because the knife doesnt really have a point to it so i used my cappings scratcher for those spots.

    i extracted 6 frames and got about 2-3 cups of loose cappings (not melted yet), also got almost 3 gallons of clover honey - very yummy!

    i have alot more to extract but it wasnt capped yet so maybe this coming weekend.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Westerville, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    10

    Post

    Wowser...Such good advice a number of topics. Thanks to all. One thought...and I welcome any replys.

    A number of folks indicated they used a surrated knife. It seems like if you had two of them...and kept one hot in boiling water while using the other...I think you get what I mean...it would do the job for someone with just a few hives.

    I'm only looking at 12 medium depth supers here. Seems like the serrated knife might just do the trick.

    thanks again to all

    burt

  16. #16

    Post

    I used an electric carving knife and it worked better than heating a serrated knife.....Just my 2 cents

    ------------------
    You have to stop and smell the roses......but please watch out for my bees.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Gillett, Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    265

    Post

    i forgot to mention that i did NOT heat my serrated knife and still worked like a charm

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    229

    Post

    Anybody else has used an electric carving knife successfully?
    I don't have one but would consider buying one if it works. Definitely don't want to overheat the honey one bit with an electric uncapping knife that is too hot.

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