Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 58 of 58

Thread: old combs

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Joelz wrote:

    i am not losing any bees dear and cornell university does not teach a biological mite control because at this time there is no complete biological control, thats fact.

    Reply:
    Yes, I already understand that you are using various dopes to keep your bees from dying. This is understandable from previous posts.

    You are mistaken, as there there is a complete biological control for field management for control of parasitic mites and secondary diseases. Fortunately it does not involve petro chemical, it just involved honest field work.

    You further wrote:
    what bothers me is your dialog to new bekeepers that in a year or so will face the question as why there be are gone, read any of the last test results as published in the december issue of bee journal there is no complete control for mites, except yours,

    Reply:
    Yes, I understand that even Cornell would like to teach beekeepers how to keep bees without usage of any dopes/crutches for parasitic mite and secondary disease control. Can you relate any, progress that has been made?

    Yes, the December issue of ABJ painted a bleak future for continued chemical usage. The pesticide treatmill is hard. This is shown quite adequately here.

    You further added:
    my hive consitaantly produce double the pennsyvania average of 60lbs.and i understand your reasoning for censoring my replies, finally someone is questioning you.........
    [This message has been edited by Admin (edited December 23, 2001).]

    Reply:
    I myself have not edited here, and I am glad you hives are producing double the Penn. standard from what you say. Question: Do you feed artificial feeds? Additionally, do you take honey and then feed syrup, etc for going into winter?

    Regards,

    Dee A. Lusby


  2. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Joelz wrote:

    see i appriciate your opinion, but please try and refrain from degrading my intelligence, coumaphose was given a emergency use permit by the usda, i am totally unaware of any coumphose resistant mites in the u.s.

    Reply:
    This was officially announced by government officials for the state of Florida on 30Nov01. Check here with the USDA for scope I would suggest to you.

    You further wrote:
    also how is comb rendered useless in a hive where coumaphose is used?

    Reply:
    coumaphos is an organophosphate, actually an old Nazi nerve chemical and impossible to get out of wax combs once used. It is doumented that even usage with the first treatment means that while the strips are in a colony you cannot requeen nor will it naturally requeen itself via supercedure. This should be evident also to you in reading the Dec ABJ articles posted there, besides previous written material months earlier in ABJ.

    You also wrote Joelz:
    and as for requeening with supercedure cells, not the best route to requeen with.

    Reply:
    Natural supercedure is the way bees have requeened for thousands of years without man.Why is it not best or do you equate bees to poodles nowadays for keeping, along with other house pets that need continued help?

    You further wrote:
    nattural ways since the beginning of time? really at the beginning of time we didnt have small hive beetle, varroa and treaceal mites, migartory pollenators criscrossing the counrty, or packaged bees moved across the country,

    Reply:
    THis is quite true we didn't. And if we don't stop this artificial enlarging of bees to detrimental parameters, we won't have bees. The predators and scavengers will keep coming in until man is willing to make the changes to work within a natural environment.
    That could mean no migratory if they don't learn to change their ways back to within reason. Also changes are needed for package bees. But they will all learn or go out of business. Real world beekeeping is hard when only quick fix and artificial measures are taught that have no bearing upon realworld circumstances. Because of what is happening, one would think that institutions of higher learning would rise to meet the challenge! Teaching what works.......

    You further wrote:
    and as for me being under stress, the only stress i have is your continued point of view to beginner beekeepers that organic beekeeping is the only way of keeping bees.
    organic beekeeping may work for a time by very experienced beekeepers, but for a beginner to try and master beekeeping and organics at the same time is a recepi for desaster.

    Reply:
    Teaching biological beekeeping to beginners is not hard. The principles are not hard. It just takes loving bees and wanting to work with them and take a little longer time in the field. It is the older beekeepers on the pesticide junky treadmill that are hard to teach and get out of dependency habits.

    You further wrote:
    i stand behind my opinion as does cornell university beekeeper program, censor and edit this reply if you wish. as you have done in the past with anyone who disagrees with you
    [This message has been edited by Admin (edited December 23, 2001).]

    Reply:
    I have not edited your posts on this thread and am quite not afraid of deep thoughts nor administrators. Have been one myself for too long. Unfortunately I am schooled in the old ways of beekeeping and not into bowing down to the petro chemical Gods, nor quick fixes in life that don't work, and I am not afraid of getting my fingernails dirty working bees.

    I very much look forward to continued dialogue with you and how Cornell thinks. It should be enlightening for everyone to say the least.

    Perhaps we can come to an understanding for learning to help our industry and you at Cornell can upgrade your program then.

    Regards,

    Dee A. Lusby


  3. #43
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Hi Phillip and Andrey

    This is something that will have to be done in the future I can see. I have conducted workshops for years off and on, both at National beekeepers meetings and Regional and various State Asociation meetings.

    Right now I and my husband are booked with beekeepers coming in for the next several months to learn how to make 4.9mm foundation processing and wax rendering the old way, with review of the field (2 days here on field)for workup of bees through regression.

    But this is probably something that should be done, have a meeting for biological beekeepers set up where all can come and talk and exchange ideas. It doesn't necessarily have to be here, as we have taken our wax dipping pots and embossing rollers to Alabama and Calif in the past for workshops for hands on learning while holding workshops that lasted a few days.

    As beekeepers are now springing up all over the USA using 4.9mm foundation, perhaps an event should be planned ahead and centralized.

    Right now we are expanding from 700 to 900-1,000 colonies this year to wrap up getting back to normal levels with our bees. Following that we will gain time by not having to retool 8,000 to 9,000 frames each year during the off season months. Perhaps this time could be well spent helping others in workshops once or twice a year for hands on training. After all the foundation and explaination of working up broodnests is the center life of our colonies.

    Yes, this is good thought you two. I will work on getting ready for doing it once we are past this coming season. You are right, it's about time we all started doing this.

    Someting to plan for

    Very best regards,

    Dee A. Lusby

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,650

    Post

    Joel wrote:
    "i am totally unaware of any coumphose resistant mites in the u.s."

    ABJ - January 2002
    Reduced Chemical Beekeeping 1
    by Carl Wenning

    "This form of biological evolution is mirrored in beekeeping by the presence of Apistan - resistant (and now some Checkmite - resistant) Varroa and Terramycin - resistant American foulbrood. Using chemicals to treat honey bee pests ultimately only forces evolution's hand, and both bees and beekeepers turn out to be the losers. The fact of the matter is that the array of chemical treatments beekeepers use today ultimately will fail."

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Sequim / Wa / USA
    Posts
    175

    Post

    Hi folks
    Once upon a time there were scientists.
    And they proposed that the world was flat and stood on a number or pillary supports. Or they said that anything beyond the atmosphere is occupied by ether ( whatever that was or is.)Of course everybody swore by that until some other one came around and quoted a different hypothesis. And they became the gospel for the time beeing.
    Further. I have not read all the posts , but from what I understand there is a vast amount of different scientifically proposed management styles. Which is the correct one ?. And since a host of scientists have researched the same goal and came to all these different conclusions , which one is correct ?
    My little obs : Old comb has NOT discolered the honey.Why should honey be always light ? It is merely an immaterial OPINION expressed by some individual and subject to "feelings" or " believes".I could go on and repeat again what was already quoted. How many books were written on the bee subject ? Why ?
    I have the notion that Nobody knows it all because it would be already cut and dry within the time span of the written word or the printing press.
    Happy 2002
    JDF

  6. #46
    Pollinator Guest

    Post

    It's not clear from the original posting whether this has been used for brood, or if only used in supers above an excluder.

    If it has only been used for honey storage, it will darken very little, and it's more likely to be safe from AFB contamination. I'd use it without replacing comb, and as someone else mentioned, save the bees a lot of work. I doubt very much that there's a buildup of pathogens in super comb. If super (extracting) comb doesn't give 20 years of service, a lot of work and expense is wasted. This, of course, would not be true of supers with no excluders or faulty excluders, that let queens run upstairs.

    If it has had brood cycles in it, I'd be prone to replace it. At the very least I would look at it carefully for AFB scale. If you find it, burn the comb and frames, and scorch the boxes. Every scale has billions of foulbrood spores.

    You can see a photo of scale in the comb at The Pollination Home Page. I don't have the exact reference handy now, but run a search for AFB scale, and the search engine at the bottom of the first page.

    Dave Green
    The Pollination Home Page: http://pollinator.com

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,650

    Lightbulb

    Some more current information (Bee Culture - Jan. 2002) for Joel regarding Coumaphos written by the editor of Bee Culture, Kim Fllottum:

    "Now, finally, results of several studies released this year show beyond doubt that the presence of either Apistan or Checkmite+ adversely affect queens and drones. Developing queens treated with Coumaphos suffered high mortality rates, acceptance was low, larvae died, physical abnormalities were common, they weighed less, had lower ovary weights . . . and all at exposure rates below the EPA tolerance level of 100 ppm in the beeswax they were living on. Meanwhile, Fluvalinate reduced sperm counts in drones and reduced the size of queens at maturity, according to the reports."

    [This message has been edited by Barry (edited January 05, 2002).]

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Collegeville, PA
    Posts
    2

    Exclamation

    WOW! Quite a lot to handle for someone just looking into getting started.
    I grew up on a small farm. I moved away, and have a small family of a two-year-old boy, and four year old girl. I live in SE PA, [Collegeville] and the area, in which we now live, while only 15 miles from the farm, has become the victim of the greed of the builders. People have moved into this area, which was once agrarian, and turned it into a place where the mini-vans all compete for parking spaces in the ever-expanding malls. This is certainly not a place where I want my children to grow up.

    To wit-I am moving my family back to the farm. We will have our own chickens, and I plan to start back in on the organic farming I did while growing up, and up to when I went to college.

    I am very interested in getting started in beekeeping, and have just now started in getting information together. I look forward to the information presented here, and appreciate that all views are welcome. Seems that human nature is the same everywhere. What we need is less human, and more nature...JK

    ------------------
    Jonathan Kriebel
    Das Sauen Öhr Farm
    Green Lane, PA
    jbkriebel@speakeasy.net

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Hi,

    I am very interested in getting started in beekeeping, and have just now started in getting information together. I look forward to the information presented here, and appreciate that all views are welcome. Seems that human nature is the same everywhere. What we need is less human, and more nature...JK

    reply:

    Good luck in beekeeping. When do you plan to start? If you have questions just ask. As there are many good beekeepers here to get advise from.

    Clay


  10. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Wrexham,North Wales,UK
    Posts
    7

    Post

    Hi Johnathan,

    The best few quid (UK pounds) I ever spent was on a beginners course with my local beekeepers club. I got lots of information and contacts for people to pester with my problems. I joined the club. We have visits to each others' apiaries (bee yards)to see how they do it.

    Very recommended. Your head will be buzzing with questions, and there's no better place to get answers.

    ------------------
    Lu

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Collegeville, PA
    Posts
    2

    Post

    To Clayton:

    I plan to start this year. However, given my propensity for researching and information gathering, that might be a bit optomistic <<G>>. There are two beekeepers in the area that I know of, and I plan to start with asking them for help and information. Hopefully they can tell me what the local clubs are in the area. Looks like I found the right place. BTW, I had a restoration business (17th Century homes), and a full shop, so I will have no trouble with the sawdust end of it. I already have the plans downloaded, but need more information before I cut any wood...JK

    ------------------
    Jonathan Kriebel
    Das Sauen Öhr Farm
    Green Lane, PA
    jbkriebel@speakeasy.net

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    knoxville tn usa
    Posts
    34

    Post

    hello all,
    I have never seen beekeepers so snippy. I think you guys should start brewing mead with your honey. It might take the edge off. As far as used equipment goes, it is risky bussiness with a disease such as american fowl brood. Its spores survive for a hundred years and unfortunately the best treatment for complete erradication is burning the hive. If you have some used equipment you can boil it in a lye bath. It will kill the spores. This is a hard project that must be done outdoors and with allot of protective clothing.It is very dangerous. Just wanted to mention it. Also to the organic beekeepers out there i salute you. I think fgmo will be the way of the future. The rules change yearly for beekeeping these days
    cheers
    chris

  13. #53
    curranian Guest

    Post

    I was wondering what you mean when you say organic. I would not think beekeeping could be organic . Would it not be hard to contain ones bees to a field with no chemicals when on the other side of the fence is a field of clover that has just been sprayed with some chemical or other. Do you really believe the bees no the difference. Cheers Ian!( I just thought I would add this because I have seen the word organic used quite a bit here.)

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Hi,

    We are talking about organic practices as pertains to the beekeeper. No adding chems, dopes, oils, acids, ect. In general bees don't aim for chems and pesticides in the field. Mostly talking about the beekeeper directly contaminating hive products. We all know we can't control the bees. Just aiming for a high realistic ideal that is plausible.

    Clay

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Boston, MA, USA
    Posts
    18

    Angry

    Here we go again....

  16. #56
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971
    I shall rest and say no more......

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Pensacola, Fla
    Posts
    55

    Post

    Just discovered something interesting here in Pensacola, Fla. and I imagine it will apply in other locations: I had to park in the rear of the local doughnut shop and saw what I thought was a swarm at the dumpster. Investigated and it was bees reclaiming the sugars and other trash. A day later was driving slowly in another area of town and saw light through wings of flying bees just above the car. Stopped and discovered bees in an oak near the road. Followed their flight and sure enough they were going to a dumpster behind a "Poor Folks". Then I began to remember growing up in Western Pennsaylvania with a little necessity house out back which always had honey bees working hard behind that little house - nasty critters. Little wonder that they can make a honey crop in New York city.

  18. #58

    Post

    I am looking for a bunch of old combs for an art project i am doing. Specifically i want to sandwich them between two pieces of glass and mount them in a window cut-out of a door. The space i need to fill is about 24" square, and i would like to get combs that are fairly thin, say less than an inch. I would be willing to pay something, but i would hope to find some combs for a relatively inexpensive price. Can anyone help me???

    Thanks!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads