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Thread: Robbing ??

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cooperstown, NY
    Posts
    87

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    This is my first year with bees. I was told after we extract, the wet frames/supers can be put either on the hives or stacked near by and the bees would clean them up. We had 4 or 5 supers on the tractor and the bees went crazy before we could put them on the hives. No there are many dead bees > Did we make a drastic mistake? Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    1,966

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    You made a common mistake but you gained in experience. Avoid robbing at all costs. When there is a lack of nectar coming in it's called a "dearth". During this time all those thousands of foragers have nothing else to do that they are fit for, so they are like pirates that are bored. Any honey or syrup one leaves around reminds them that they are pirates and they clean the spill up and start looking for more. The weaker hives in the area start to look good. With a lot of hives it could lead to a frenzy.

    This doesn't mean you can't put empties on a hive. Thats a HIVE, and not a tractor. Sneak in and do so without much fanfare and without opening the hive too long. At this time of year you should have entrance reducers down to a small size. A neighbors hive may have been in that cleanup of the tractor and will be back to clean up your hive.

    Stacking supers outside is something I will only do when there is a flow on. It takes them quite awhile to clean them up this way. If you see a lot of bees flying with a patch over one eye either you have robbing going on or you have tested too much mead.

    Dickm

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

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    I spray mine with Certan and store them "wet" without the bees cleaning them up. I heard this from a beekeeper who says that the left over honey gives them a jump start when you add the super on.

    I have no idea if it works or not but it is one more step eliminated.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

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    Anytime supers are not on a hive or in a bee proof building you need to consider having them covered. If you use fume boards they make good covers, or you can cut some plywood and lay on top of the stack.

    Robbing by the bees is a problem, but what bothers me are all the hornets and wasps that get involved.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

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    >Anytime supers are not on a hive or in a bee proof building you need to consider having them covered.

    That's the key to putting them back on the hives. Don't let the bees in until you want them in. You need bee tight lids and bottoms on them.

    A feeding frenzy is not a good thing for the bees. They will fight over the honey and often start robbing besides.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cooperstown, NY
    Posts
    87

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    Thanks for the quick responses. I got all of the supers picked up and put away. Thanks Again.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    124

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    I had a question about robbers too...there was a bumblebee sitting on the outside of one of the bottom boxes today. I'm sure this was probably a fluke...but do bumblebees rob out our girls?
    Two roads diverged in a wood and I - I took the one less traveled by...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

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    In my experience the bees won't let her in. I've been wondering how reliable a sign this is on the strength of the hive. If it let's her in is it too weak to survive?

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

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    After I extract I put the wet supers on a trailer and put them in an open field about 300 yards form any bee hives, I haven’t had any problems with robbing around the hives the hornets get in the act to by cleaning out any dead brood left in the comb.

    Chef: Have you had good luck using Certan or B-401 I tried it this year so far. I haven’t seen any wax moth in the treated comb.

    Amanda97fan: Once in a while I will see a bumblebee around the hives since they seem to be alone they aren’t any threat, once I saw a bumblebee make the mistake of landing on the landing board a couple of guard bees jumped it and in the confusion the bumblebee ran into the hive, after a few seconds the bumble bee tried to get out but was dragged back into the hive for the execution. Hornets are more of a threat.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

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    I find bumblebees(carpenter??) camping out by my hives at night occasionally. Occasionally I see one scurry into a hive. Often I see dead bumblebee carcasses in front of the hive, or a small ball of bees with bumble in the middle on the landing board. A few bumblebees won't cause much problem. Wasps are another matter, though....

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