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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Forest, Oh. Hancock
    Posts
    10

    Question

    What is the best way to introduce a queen of one race to a hive of another? I am trying to introduce Carniolan queens to hives of Itialians and Buckfast. Pulling the old queen for a day or two before does not work, when the queen is released they try to kill her. Making a nuc and waiting a day does not work either. Spraying with sugar water, liquid smoke or arrid xtra dry doesn't work.
    Surely the is a way to do this without losing the queen.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,383

    Post

    Beezy -

    There are no guarantees when it comes to requeening. There ARE things one can do to increase the odds of acceptance, however. Starting the queen in nuc and then joining with the newspaper method tends to be the safest way to get acceptance from all I've heard by beekeepers over the years.

    Over the last few years I've stopped buying queens from breeders and have gone to letting my own bees raise their own using the genetic stock from my area. The more I study and read on the issue of queens, the more I feel compelled to working with and selecting from the stock I have within my own apairy .

    Here is a good post by Aaron Morris a few years ago that addresses some of your thoughts.

    ---------------QUOTE----------
    Date: Mon, 9 Aug 1993 14:33:30 EDT
    Reply-To: Discussion of Bee Biology <BEE-L@ALBNYVM1.BITNET>
    Sender: Discussion of Bee Biology <BEE-L@ALBNYVM1.BITNET>
    From: Aaron Morris <SYSAM@ALBANY.BITNET>
    Subject: Requeening: When and How?

    Requeening is always a tricky exercise, whenever you attempt it.
    Chances of success are lessened with increased population, hence the
    best time to requeen is early spring or late fall. Most literature will
    suggest that you introduce a new queen into a nuc made up of frames from
    the hive to be requeened. The new queen is introduced to the nuc box
    (which is of course queenless). When the bees in the nuc have accepted
    the new queen, the nuc should then be reunited with the original hive
    using the newspaper method, after the original queen is killed and
    removed from the hive.


    This method requires a good deal of manipulation, first to set up a nuc
    and introduce a new queen, then finding the original queen in the old
    hive to remove her, and uniting the nuc and hive after the new queen is
    accepted in the nucleus. All these manipulations will be made harder by
    the fact that your hive is ill-tempered in the first place. My advice is
    to wait until the fall, after the honey harvest. Some of my largest
    yields have come from my nastiest hives. Then, since you waited
    that long you may wait until spring to attempt to requeen. A failed
    attempt to requeen in the spring can be corrected by the bees themselves
    (they can rear a queen on their own from eggs laid by the former queen),
    whereas a failed attempt in the fall will ultimately lead to a failed
    hive. Late in the season is not the 'proper' time for a hive to raise a
    new queen, so if a fall attempt fails, so will your hive.


    Hints for locating the queen: She will be in the vicinity of current
    queen activity (ie closest to the newly laid eggs). If you pull frames
    filled with stores, you will not find the queen on these frames. If you
    pull a frame with sealed brood, the queen will probably not be on these
    frames either. However, if you pull a frame with newly laid eggs,
    chances are high that the queen will be on this frame or one adjacent to
    it. Try to 'scan' the frame rather than 'examine' it. It is easier to
    have the queen 'pop out at you' as opposed to examining every inch of a
    frame in an attempt to locate the elusive queen. Practice on any
    "Where's Waldo" book!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Sequim / Wa / USA
    Posts
    175

    Exclamation

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by beezy:
    What is the best way to introduce a queen of one race to a hive of another? I am trying to introduce Carniolan queens to hives of Itialians and Buckfast. Pulling the old queen for a day or two before does not work, when the queen is released they try to kill her. Making a nuc and waiting a day does not work either. Spraying with sugar water, liquid smoke or arrid xtra dry doesn't work.
    Surely the is a way to do this without losing the queen.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


  4. #4
    Howard Bowles Guest

    Post

    I have just gone through the situation you described. It really took some effort to re-queen an Italian colony with a Carniolan queen. One important aspect that I think many of us overlook, even though its discussed in most texts, is that re-queening is most successful when a honey flow is on. If it isn't then feed them. After my first unsuccessful attempt I re-read Diana Sammataro's book and realized that I should have fed them. On my next effort I fed them syrup, starting two days before introduction of the queen. It certainly settled them down and the re-queening was successful, i.e., she is alive in the box though she isn't laying like I think she should.

    Good luck, H. Bowles

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Forest, Oh. Hancock
    Posts
    10
    Thanks much for your input! I've used the nuc but did not recombine with newspaper, I've also fed them but started to feed the same day I introduced the queen.
    It's in the details!!! The things you don't know, CAN hurt you!

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