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Thread: Chalkbrood

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    S. W. \'Washington State, Columbia River Gorge
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    71

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    What do you all think about reusing hive bodies and brood frame infected with chalkbrood? I have read about it but there seems to be no info on reusing this equipment. In the past, an infected hive seems to work its way out of the problem but this one hive has been cleaning these little white mummies out every day for a month or so.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,332

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    >What do you all think about reusing hive bodies and brood frame infected with chalkbrood?

    IMO chalkbrood is a queen or enviromental problem not an infection problem. Of course infestation addes to the problem, but I personally don't worry about it. Putting the hive in the sun, adding some ventilation or requeening has always cleared it up for me. I generally consider it a strike against keeping that queen and certainly against breeding from her.

    >I have read about it but there seems to be no info on reusing this equipment.

    I don't think people are really worried about it.

    > In the past, an infected hive seems to work its way out of the problem but this one hive has been cleaning these little white mummies out every day for a month or so.

    It sounds like you need to change something. Get them in full sunlight, provide ventilation and get a new queen.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    S. W. \'Washington State, Columbia River Gorge
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    Thanks. My hives are in full sunlight and very well ventilated. Also, I plan on requeening this fall.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
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    2,071

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    You need to identify if they are in fact mummies.

    Look here:
    http://www.masterbeekeeper.org/B_files/disease1.htm

    You need to check your larvae to see if the if the cells for chalkbrood mycelia. If this is not the case, it is likley not chalkbrood.

    Chances are that if you are reusing old comb that may have contained pollen. The pollen may have gone bad, and the bees are cleaning it out. This can resemble chalkbrood symptoms. They will clean it out as they expand, so it may take a month or so.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    S. W. \'Washington State, Columbia River Gorge
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    71

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    That is a great site. Yep, it is chalk brood.

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