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Thread: Carniolans???

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Edgefield County, South Carolina
    Posts
    651

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    Please enlighten me on the race of bees (Carniolans). The experience you have had with them, their temperment, honey production etc. in comparison to the pretty bee mentioned in another post. May try some since spring is just around the corner. I don't know if climate or geographical location plays into the mixture,but I live in SOUTH Carolina,it's just "SOUTH" Of that other state north carolina

    [size="1"][ December 18, 2005, 08:43 AM: Message edited by: sc-bee ][/size]
    sc-bee

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

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    In the Fingerlakes of Upstate New York area they are some of the consistenly best bees we've used in overall performance. Winter well, good spring build up and great honey producers. We did find they did not have the heavy pollen gathering of Italians and buckfast so don't usually run pollen traps on those hives. Good proplis producers, almost always plug the propolis traps. We have wintered them in your area although for the large part they stay here in the north and then survivors are used as breeding stock. I know Chuck Kutic winters several hundred carni hives in your area and seems to do well. I know from his nucs that they tend to be more prone to chalkbrood in the South which can be problematic.

    [size="1"][ December 18, 2005, 09:13 AM: Message edited by: Joel ][/size]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    943

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    A lot of folks around here consider Carniolans to be the best alternative to the Italians. Although we really don't need the extra overwintering ability, Carnies don't rob like the Italians. They also won't continue to raise brood like crazy through the midsummer dearth which will result in much less stores or even require feeding by the end of the summer before the fall flow.

    I requeened with all NWCs late this summer. Next year I can give a first hand report.

    I do have much first hand knowledge of the disadvantages of Italians

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    chilliwack, bc
    Posts
    637

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    we've ran carni's for about 15 years now, these ones come from the higher elevations in eastern europe. through all this time they have become climatized to our area. they are black with grey to white stripes of hair (the queens are jet black). they are good honey producers, gentle, overwinter great and build up quick in the spring. i love my carni darlings.
    Will Gruenwald Chilliwack BC

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,906

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    They are also my stock of choice. Winter very well up here. Little slower on brooding in the spring, but explode after the first pollen comes in. Easy, sometimes too easy, to shut brooding down in the fall.

    They are however more prone to swarming, but I really dont notice it as much as others claim.

    [size="1"][ December 18, 2005, 12:00 PM: Message edited by: Ian ][/size]
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,374

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    Carnies don't rob like the Italians. They also won't continue to raise brood like crazy through the midsummer dearth
    These are the qualities that prevent my recommending them where dearths are common and Italians are prevalent. When they shut down in mid-summer, they will invariably get robbed out around here. They just aren't strong enough to compete with the indigenous bees with the small summer cluster. Where you don't have the extreme conditions, I can understand how they would be desireable.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

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    I have a number of them for some years. I like them a lot. Swarming and shutdown seem to be what people don't like. Stay on top of them, make splits, reverse and requeen every year. That takes care of the swarming. The 2/3 week dearth we have in the summer here, can be handled with a little feed after the early honey has been harvested.

    Dickm

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