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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    144

    Post

    I seem to be having a good year. The weather is finally cooperating, with the right amount of rain, instead of drought or torrential, blossom destroying downpours like I've had other years. The bees have been working hard and I've got a good bit of capped honey.

    I guess I didn't plan well enough, cause I will be putting my last few empty boxes on tomorrow, and still need 3 more to give to those that need one. I 'might' be able to get some assembled boxes locally, but if I can't, they will be overcrowded by the time I get some shipped and assembled.

    Can I just line a sturdy box with a plastic bag and pull frames into it? Then I could seal it up and keep it away from mice til I get someone to extract them for me. This is my fourth year with bees, but the first that I will have any significant amount of honey, so I guess I was taken by surprise.

    Diane W

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Parkton, North Carolina
    Posts
    253

    Post

    I have been told that you need to extract within 12 hours to keep the wax moth larvae from hatching and destroying your comb and honey. You can freeze the frames for 24 hours to kill the larvae and then I think it will keep but not sure how long. Someone will come along who knows more. Theresa.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,104

    Post

    It's hard to say how long you can get away with combs not gaurded by the bees. I'v been known to stack them in my kitchen for a few weeks, but sometimes the ants find them and sometimes the wax moths already had eggs in them. It's risky business once they are off the hives with no bees to gaurd them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    144

    Post

    Since posting this, I heard back from the local woodworker. I'll have more supers by the middle of next week, so I may try pulling some of the frames, at least temporarily.

    If I don't open up the brood nest in a couple hives, I'll have swarms.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    McGraw,NY,USA
    Posts
    580

    Post

    If you have plasticell foundation you could scrape the honey and comb off the frames and strain the honey as well as process the wax . Then you could put the wet supers back on hives.Sell the honey and buy more equipment.It seems like a waste of drawn comb but if you have no other options it`ll work...Rick
    Turn stumbling blocks into stepping stones

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
    Posts
    456

    Post

    you can freeze the frames for a couple of days to kill the inevitable wax moth eggs (they are mainly on the frames you need to store) then seal up tight from insects. as long as they are double sealed you have some time. keep em cool.
    "Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes"
    Henry David Thoreau, Walden

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