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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    81

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    I am wanting to plant a substantial amount of Marigolds around my yard this year but wanted to know if the honey from Marigolds was good tasting. What is your opinion and how does it compare to say clover honey?

    Dave

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Julian, NC, USA
    Posts
    252

    Post

    I am unaware of bees even bothering to work marigolds. If they provide any nectar, it must be insignificant and doubtful that it would affect the quantity or quality of honey produced.

    Kurt

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

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    Bee do NOT work marigolds to my knowledge, though I saw one sitting on a marigold last summer, resting. Marigolds are a classic "companion plant" used to repel some insects.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,571

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    Marigold were a source of pyrethroids for pest control. One of the earliest pesticides, I believe. So, like George says, "used to repel some insects."
    Mark Berninghausen #youmatter

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Native marigold of the Louisiana area west to New Mexico and Arizona areas are a very good source of honey. There are other areas of the country that have marigold species but it does not grow in large enough numbers.

    Many Marigold that are store bought, are hybrids and propogated species that are not particularly good sources for pollen or nectar.

    I have seen bees on marigolds but it seems it was at the end of summer when other sources were not available.

    My father-in-law in Denmark grows a good amount marigolds at his place. There is a nordic bee about the size of the common honey bee that just loves them. I have no idea if this is a true honey bee or a solitary species. I have not tracked them or researched further.

    A good honey plant book will point out that marigolds are considered a honey plant. Just very specific to certain areas of the country.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,571

    Post

    Interesting. Good to know. Thanks.
    Mark Berninghausen #youmatter

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

    Post

    >Source of Pyrethroids

    Marigolds are of the genus Tagetes whereas the pyrethum daisy is listed variously as
    Tanacetum cinerariaefolium,
    Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium, or
    Tanecetum coccinium,
    depending on the source (age) of the information.

    I don't think marigolds actually produce any significant amount of pyrethroids. On the other hand, I have customers who swear that marigolds repel many pests including insects, slugs, mites, and even rabbits. The entire plant has a slightly disagreeable odor.

    I've planted them around my garden and found they definitely don't repel deer.

    I've never noticed any great amount of bee activity on marigolds, but I've always planted the fancy double types. If you were to plant the old fashioned single flowered types, I would think the pollen could be attractive to bees. I know the bees ignore my double zinnias, but are all over the single varieties.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Hillside, your right on the mark.

    I bought bags and bags of hybrid tulips years ago. After the second season, most died out. I replanted, and the same thing happened. Only then did I find out that many hybrid and special propogated varieties only last a year or two. Many hybrids of different flowers are steril, or at least way below the abilities of the native plant that it started from.

    I never buy hybrid flower bulbs or seed anymore. I want flowers that will last many years, and are not designed for me the customer, to repurchase over and over again.

    I like the native flower and species. There are bulb and seed plants swapping clubs and sites intended on keeping the pure native or the "old-time' flowers going.

    Unfortunately, most bulbs and seeds are being grown for looks and desease resistance. Little consideration is given in regards to bees.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    81

    Post

    Thanks everyone, I am planting the marigolds to repell insects from around my fruit trees and personally swear by it. I'm new at bees though so I was unsure. I just want to make sure I don' thave marigold flavered honey. YUCK... I guess it repells me too. :>

    Dave

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,571

    Post

    Could be a big seller. Don't turn your nose up too high.
    Mark Berninghausen #youmatter

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Marigold honey is actually considered good. But you need to plant alot of it.....

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