Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    new gloucester, maine usa
    Posts
    26

    Sad

    Hi, my question is that my hives are in partial shade, they get morning sun untill
    about 11:00 I have not got honey from them
    in two years since I got them, thought it
    was the drought or the queens. then thought
    it might be the big pine limbs that overhang
    the hives, was going to cut them to let more
    sun in.any ideas what my problem could be.
    they are carniolans.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Belmont, NC, USA
    Posts
    38

    Post

    have you tried replacing your queens?, what about feeding them?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

    Post

    Yes I don't think the shade or lack of it is your problem,although I have found my bee's does better in the sun,but even in the shade you should get a honey crop.It could be a number of thing's Queen, most of the time it's spring build-up or lack of it.do you prepare before the honey flow at least 41 day's or there about? the number of super's drawn comb- foundation? the list can go on& on.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    new gloucester, maine usa
    Posts
    26

    Post

    The first year they got everything filled
    out and was able to get honey enough for
    the winter,the second year I thought they
    were doing fine except they only chewed on
    the supers, and they still only got honey
    for them. so I thought about reqeening,in
    fact am going to call tomorrow to oder 2 russians.but still think I might be doing
    something wrong. they do seem to be building
    up good though.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    With the temps in Maine, I would not hesitate to put the hives in full sun and forget the shade they speak about in most books, etc. You already have a shorter season in Maine, so prolong the available days the bees have by getting them in the field as early as possible.
    If it gets above say 80-85, then prop the lid cover or provide upper entrances which help with ventalation. I always have upper entrances and believe they make a huge difference.

    The other thing to consider, given everything else hive wise is correct. It is very important you go into spring with a very strong hive population. You may be missing the main flow which sometimes is very early in the season and some hives have not built up large numbers. Then they spend more time keeping brood warm and miss honey production. Next year stimulate early brood production. Good luck.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    new gloucester, maine usa
    Posts
    26

    Post

    sorry . to answer your question I do medicate
    and feed fumidil in the spring. have had no mites and no other problems that I know of.
    Linwood

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    With the temps in Maine, I would not hesitate to put the hives in full sun and forget the shade they speak about in most books, etc. You already have a shorter season in Maine, so prolong the available days the bees have by getting them in the field as early as possible.
    If it gets above say 80-85, then prop the lid cover or provide upper entrances which help with ventalation. I always have upper entrances and believe they make a huge difference.

    The other thing to consider, given everything else hive wise is correct. It is very important you go into spring with a very strong hive population. You may be missing the main flow which sometimes is very early in the season and some hives have not built up large numbers. Then they spend more time keeping brood warm and miss honey production. Next year stimulate early brood production. Good luck.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    new gloucester, maine usa
    Posts
    26

    Post

    Thanks for the replies I will put them into
    full sun, I think I will still requeen, had
    a hive in another location same deal with
    some shade and got honey from them.thats why
    I thought I was doing somthing wrong.
    Linwood

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Ridgeway, VA , USA
    Posts
    72

    Post

    Your hives may be swarming and leaving you with small populations to gather honey.
    Are you doing anything to prevent swarming in the spring? Are you using doubles for brood or a single, Give us a little more info. I'm with BjornBee, I would put them in full sun to utilize as much of the day as possible. Just some thoughts. Duane in VA.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,553

    Post

    I would also vote for full sun. Requeening every year is a good idea anyway. A queen can change everything.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    new gloucester, maine usa
    Posts
    26

    Post

    I have not seen any swarming, but that doesn't mean they haven't they seem to have
    plenty of bees, and I have not seen any
    swarm cells. We have been in a drought for a couple of years. I am going to cut a few big pine limbs, that I think will help.If it isn't enough I'll move them out a bit.
    And I'm going to requeen two hives, I think
    the combination will help.thanks again for
    the replies, Linwwod

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Cool

    Ny Hives are in full sun, the old boy that brought out the first hive to our place said that is the way to go as they warm up faster and get more active earler in the day, and gather later in to the evening

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads