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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Borden, In
    Posts
    98

    Post

    Is putting weight on a hive cover neccesary? If so how much? A brick, half a concrete block or a full block? What do most Beeks use? I have small Patio wall blocks on now, about 5 or 6 pounds each. I am planning on putting a number on the block for each hive.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Dayton, OH USA
    Posts
    303

    Post

    Sounds like that should be plenty...especially if your hives are already protected from strong winds which is what the weight is meant to protect against also.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    With the winds we have, a brick doesn't give me confidence. Two bricks do. I also tend to put the weight on the side of the hive that gets the wind.
    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,071

    Post

    I use half blocks

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/nature...e2.jpg&.src=ph

    When I place the block so that the holes to the side, it means the colony is queenright and performing fine.

    Holes placed so that they are facing forward means there some type of minor problem and I need to refer to this colonies record for assessment. It might indicate for example that the colony either needs tended to more often or is a low performer for some reason and might be a canidate for requeening.

    Holes pointing up in the air indicate a colony that may have serious queen problems or disease that need tended to real fast.

    I do it this way so that I can do most of my record keeping when I finish working the entire yard, and the positions help me to remember which colony needs what. The blocks will remain in the position I place them as a reminder to get out there and fix what needs fixed.

    If the blocks are placed on the top in a haphazard fashion, this means the inspector has visited the yard. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Joe

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    Hey, thanks for that Joe.
    I also heard of someone who moves the weight into certain quadrants to help them remember even more details. Imagine if you divided the top into a grid 10x10, That's 100 possiblities!! Amazing!
    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Coastal North Carolina
    Posts
    126

    Post

    Half concrete blocks seem to work well here even during the hurricane season. They also provide an excellent message board as to hive condition.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Post

    I tried to place bricks in specific locations for certain things but gave up on it, too confusing for me (can't remember stuff). Now I have 3x5 note cards and pencil in top pocket to write notes on each hive after working it, when back in the house review the note card and enter into a tablet with a page dedicated to each hive, this is my permanent bee record I guess.
    We use a brick on top of each telescoping cover just to keep the lid from blowing off.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
    Posts
    1,443

    Post

    this may sound crazy, but I go without the inner cover and the bees glue the cover down. I don't need any weight on them, assuming the hive is healthy enough to produce propolis. no bricks for me.

  9. #9

    Post

    I use a granite Belgian block on each hive.
    Kinda heavy, but they were free!
    "To bee or not to bee"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    >Is putting weight on a hive cover neccesary?

    That might depend on where you live. Here it most certainly is and one brick is most certainly too light.

    > If so how much? A brick, half a concrete block or a full block?

    After haveing all the lids blow off with bricks on them one storm, I put full blocks on them. After lifting the full blocks for a while, I went to two large paving bricks or a half concrete block. The nice thing about the half concrete block is that it's easy to get a hold of.

    > What do most Beeks use?

    What ever is laying around.

    > I have small Patio wall blocks on now, about 5 or 6 pounds each.

    I can get by with that on a low hive that's between two taller ones, but I can't get away with that on a tall hive, here.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    johnstown N.Y.
    Posts
    131

    Post

    Hi, I use old break drums or rotors. Free is a good price Dan

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    I was actually hoping to use the brink method to keep records until a computer program comes out that fits me better than what is out there.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    West Newton, Pa.
    Posts
    915

    Post

    A common red brick has been good enough to keep the tops on in my neck of the woods, so far anyway. Like Joe I use the positioning of the brick for different indicators relative to the hive's condition. Laying flat, on it's side, on edge, pointing North-South, pointing East-West. All are indicators of conditions ot concers that must be addressed, good or not so good.
    Be Yourself, Everyone Else Is Taken!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,378

    Post

    I went through Rita here last September. She twisted off 75 yr old, 60ft tall hardwoods mid shank. She blew full concrete block weights off the tops of bird cages, yet she left a styrofoam clam-shell from my computer moniter where I had tossed it beside my shed.

    I use a 3"x8"x18" solid concrete pad on the tops of my hives, it weighs as much as a full concrete block but has a much lower profile.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Feild rocks here.......... for that "back to nature" look. If I didn't have weight on the tops, I'd have no tops.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    No weights here - I use ratchet straps.

    I love my ratchet straps.
    For precarious stacks of supers, the
    straps attach to screw-in type ground
    stakes rather than simply loop under
    the bottom board.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    I keep meaning to use some kind of strap. I'm tired of lifting the rocks and blocks and bricks. Now if I could just find time to do that...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,378

    Post

    Jim

    You mean like mobile home anchors? What a great idea, I have a pile of old mobile home anchors sitting on my property. That might even keep them in place during a hurricane.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

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