Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Enfield,Ct.
    Posts
    470

    Question

    I have a question on demonstration hives that I’m looking for a little help on.In 10 days I will be hosting a family reunion and having a number of hives on my property,I’m anticipating many questions.I would like to set up a demonstration hive of gentle bees for those who are interested.My problem is that the main nectar flow is over,the fall flow has’nt quite started,the weather is hot and dry and my bees are slightly defensive.I don’t want to set up a feeding station with 1:1 syrup as I still have honey supers on.My thoughts were to split one of my gentler hives,taking the queen,some brood,honey and pollen,install a feeder with 1:1 syrup,and move this about 50 ft.away from the other hives.I would leave at the original location the rest of the brood and the honey supers.My reasoning is that by shrinking the brood nest, the queen would be easier to find and the more defensive field bees would return to the old location.I would combine the two later,maybe with help from the audience if they were interested.Will this work and/or what else should I be considering.


    Thanks,Jack

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Jack:

    You wrote:
    My reasoning is that by shrinking the brood nest, the queen would be easier to find and the more defensive field bees would return to the old location.I would combine the two later,maybe with help from the audience if they were interested.Will this work and/or what else should I be considering.

    reply:
    Well, it would certainly work, but with the reunion in ten days the time frame is wrong if you are trying to raise a new queen on the queenless side, as that will take 14 days approx for the new queen to come out and another week to make to get a mating and another week beyond that to really see new brood.

    But nothing says you cannot show a queenless hive in ten days and what queen cells look like in a demonstration. Maybe also explain what the pollen is and where, the honey, etc, show the brood and identify workers and drones and just have fun giving a good talk.

    Regards.

    Dee A. Lusby

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads