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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Bend, OR USA
    Posts
    93

    Post

    Unfortunately, due to a number of non-bee related commitments this spring, I've been more of a bee-haver than a beekeeper this spring. I just did the second inspection on a hive I got over a month ago.

    What I found was no sign of brood, I couldn't see any eggs, nor find a queen or any queen cells. I've got a new queen coming this week. I am going to search for any sign of a queen one more time before the new queen arrives. My question is, should I just install her, or is there something I should do to prep the hive for her arrival?

    Thanks,
    Roger

  2. #2
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    <My question is, should I just install her, or is there something I should do to prep the hive for her arrival?>

    When you say install her you mean to put her cage in and let them eat the queen candy out over the next few days? If so then there isn’t much else you can do. Make sure they have something coming in, if there isn’t a flow on in you area then you can feed them.

    Why are they queen less? Did they swarm? If they swarmed you could have a virgin queen and she hasn’t started laying yet. Virgins are harder to find than a mated queen. I check them again before you requeen.

    BB

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,361

    Post

    In that situation I always try to put a frame of brood in to see if they try to raise a queen. Unless I see signs of a laying worker, my assumption would be they have a virgin who isn't laying yet. But you want to know.

    If you decide to put in the queen, I'd still put the cage on the top bars and see how the bees respond. If they flock to her or ignor her or attach the cage.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Bend, OR USA
    Posts
    93

    Post

    There is absolutely no sign of any brood of any age in the hive. I do have a difficult time spotting eggs without the presence of young larvae in the brood nest to indicate where to start looking more closely, however. How long after a swarm leaves does it usually take for the new queen to start laying?

    Thanks,
    Roger

  5. #5
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    <How long after a swarm leaves does it usually take for the new queen to start laying?>

    If they swarmed when the larva was 8 days old then you are looking at about 26 days, give or take a few.

    BB

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