Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 27 of 27
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    457

    Post

    Tony,

    Sorry but Bee Culture has changed its web site and my links to the articles are now broken. I tried to search their archives and it find nothing. I even just tried to display the archive articles and nothing is found. It is also way way slower than it used to be.

    I can't even find the articles in the Google cache.

    Pugs


    [This message has been edited by Pugs (edited September 21, 2004).]

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    Mark Winston writes in his book ‘Killer Bees’: “The African subspecies that was brought to South America was Apis mellifera scutellata, sometimes called the East African bee.”

    Dr. Winston did much of his graduate work in South America studying AHB. He doesn’t mention scutellata being created as a cross between adonsonii and ligustica.

    Dewey Caron writes in his book ‘Africanized Honey Bees in the Americas’ “The Aricaniced bee is a population of more or less distinct honey bees. It is the offspring of a small number of queens of a large population (race) known as the African bee or Apis mellifera scutellata that occurs naturally in parts of Africa.”

    Dr. Caron also does not mention scutellata being created as a cross between adonsoni and liguistica.

    Of the 41 queens Kerr first shipped to the Americas only one survived; it was from Tanzania in eastern Africa. Kerr’s next shipment of bees came from South Africa. (This according to Mark Winston.) A map in THATHB (p. 38) shows adansonii populating western Africa. Kerr did not, as I understand, collect any queens from western Africa. Scutellata populate eastern and southern Africa.

    In the Linnaeus classification system each race has its own name. Scutellata had already received that name in 1836. It can’t also be given to a different bee created as a cross between two more races.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,127

    Post

    >In the Linnaeus classification system each race has its own name. Scutellata had already received that name in 1836. It can’t also be given to a different bee created as a cross between two more races.

    If the title "Apis mellifera scutellata" is already a bee in East Africa, then why is it also commonly applied to a crossbreed here?

    >Dr. Winston did much of his graduate work in South America studying AHB. He doesn’t mention scutellata being created as a cross between adonsonii and ligustica.

    What does Dr. Winston call the AHB? Does he use any "classification" other than AHB?

    So does he say AHB is a cross between scuttella and ligustica?

    I would like to sort this out. Thanks for the corrections.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    demossville,ky. usa
    Posts
    59

    Post

    i am learning something new every day thank for your comment. Dick Allen feel free to jump in any time. I would like to know more. like what was dr.winston research about was it to improve on the amount of honey that be produce or the making of a stonger honeybees or what was there research about.

    ------------------
    tony

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post


    After describing how the bee, scutellata, originally arrived both Winston and Caron simply refer to it throughout the rest of their books as ‘Africanized’.

    Africanized honey bees are sometimes given the scientific name ‘Apis mellifera scutellata’ by authors, I think incorrectly, simply because that was the bee introduced into South America. Also, most EHB traits quickly disappear from offspring of EHB/AHB reproduction. I don’t believe, though, there is a true and precise scientific name for AHB yet, is there?

    Winston writes much of the analysis done on feral bees from Africa and South America show very little difference, and where differences could be found, the Africanized bees were classified much closer to the African bee than to the Europeans. He states the only major difference between the African and South American bees was that the latter were slightly larger. “...and for all practical purposes could considered the same bee.”

    And now, after a bit of further reading, a little backpedalling on my part might be appropriate. (Maybe there will be an opening for a news anchor on CBS soon.)
    :> ) When the bee came to South America it was originally thought to be adansonii. In fact Kerr also believed the queens he brought with him were adansonii. Had it not been determined the original queens were scutellata, AHB would likely be given the name Apis mellifera Adansonii.

    Here’s a good article on AHB’s in the U.S. that I’ve got bookmarked.

    http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archiv...4/bees0304.pdf

    (or use this URL)
    http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archiv...4/bees0304.htm


  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,127

    Post

    I'm sure I had read that they were adansonii and I know I've seen them call the AHB scutellata, so I assumed that both of the things I had read were correct. Perhaps they are not.

  7. #27
    João Campos Guest

    Post

    I think Allen Dick is right. So far, the AHB doesn't present a definite breed standard to be classified as a new race (and, much less, as the original 'scutellata').

    Here in Brazil, where almost all beekeepers keep AHB, we see enormous variety in behaviour, productivity, and diseases/parasites tolerance. Very often we have a very aggressive colony and a fairly docile one side-by-side.

    Much work has been done in breeding and selection, but, probably to your surprise, few, if any, to control aggressiveness. The reason is that, once you have learned to fully cope with that behaviour, it does not seem to be a big problem anymore. In fact, 'mean' bees are even thought to be a good ally for beekeepers that suffer from apiary thefts.

    Nowadays, since diseases and mites are not a serious problem here (the absolute majority of us keep bees without a single drug dose), the selection has aimed more toward productivity, not only for honey, but for pollen and propolis as well. Maybe, in some years, those works will result in a well known new race, descended from scutellata and European races.

    João Campos
    AHBkeeper
    Porto Alegre - Brazil


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads