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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Caledon, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    307

    Post

    well it was a almost a week ago I started the conversion from the DE hive to a standard hive with a SBB. This morning I took out the tray for the first time to check for mites. Only found 4. Happy about that. But what I did see really has me concerned. There appears to hundreds of bee legs amonst the pollen patties etc that have fallen through.

    Its pretty cool here now and I don't want to tear the hive down to see what is on the screen but I am afraid I might find lots of bee bodies. Is there ever a situation where they loose legs ( besides after they die) Could this be from babies that I killed be letting them get chilled that afternoon it did the conversion and the temps fell suddenly ???

    There are only a half dozen dead bees on the ground near the landing board.

    Otherwise they seem happy. Feeding on the pollen batties on the top, corn syrup, bringing some nectar and pollen, and cleaning out the old stores from the old DE frames that I put outside the hive on a cookie sheet. They're not aggressrive.

    How do you make crutches for bees ?

    [size="1"][ April 16, 2006, 01:55 PM: Message edited by: brent.roberts ][/size]
    "hobby farm" is an oxymoron
    Brent Roberts

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Post

    Chilled brood are larvae. According to Marla Spivak it is very hard to chill pupae enough to kill them. Thats why they use liquid nitrogen. Dry ice usually doesn't work. You haven't made any bees legless by letting them get cold. The legs are just pieces that get caught on the screen when they are hauling out the dead bees and small enough to fall through if they get pulled off. A lot of bees are dying in the hive at any moment.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Caledon, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    307

    Post

    Thanks for the reasurance Micheal

    It got warm enough this afternoon that I openned up.
    The was not one dead bee inside, so I guess it is just "amputations" as they drag out the normal body count.

    The best news is that in the changeover to the standard sized hive seems to be going well. The lowest deep is 50% old short frames of brood held up by wires looped over the longer Piercos, the other 50%. They have accepted the Pierco and started drawing enought comb, after 5 days, that there are eggs in the bottoms of the Pierco cells.
    I will leave them for a couple weeks now to fill that out, then move the short frames up one level, above the excluder, let them hatch out, then remove them and the conversion will be complete. The population is very strong. It's 3:00 PM so a fair number of bees are out, and I would guess the colony has 20 frames covered both sides, solid with bees.

    They are making some drone comb here and there at the bottom of the lower hive and in the second level, which will frustrate them because "SHE" can't get there.

    Anyway, all seems well. There may have been a better way, but when you start with a strong colony, I think there is a lot of forgiveness built in.
    "hobby farm" is an oxymoron
    Brent Roberts

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