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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    79

    Post

    I'm moving in the middle of a heat wave. Last time I moved my bees, I made a screened cover and removed the inner and top cover. I also blocked the entrance with screen. Both hives were placed in the back seat of our old beater Volvo that was trailered. The windows were down and I misted them with a spray bottle every time we stopped.

    Sound crazy? Maybe. This is what I was told to do by some old-timers (the screen and the mist).

    This time, the two hives will be in the same car. The trip should last two days and be in very hot weather. Will this technique work again? Am I crazy to travel during the heat of the day?

    Thanks in advance!

    Doug

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    > Am I crazy to travel during the heat of the day?

    In a word, yes.

    But if you can't simply sell the bees or
    give them away, better to put the hives
    on the luggage rack of the Volvo than in
    the car.

    We move new splits and nucs in Volvo wagons
    for home garden pollination all spring (even
    have a few on pumpkins right now), but there
    have been quite a few modifications made to
    insure the safety of the bees, including:

    a) Dark tint film on every glass surface but
    the windshield (for daytime moves).

    b) A bank of fans to move air from the front
    seat area to the "cargo bay" (back seats
    folded down) running.

    c) A much bigger A/C compressor (from a truck,
    and yes, it was a pain to kludge onto the
    usual Volvo mounting brackets) think meat
    cutting room, that's the design goal.

    And lastly, no trips over 30 mins total, with
    most deliveries and pick ups taking place in
    the pre-dawn hours.

    The screen and the misting are fine ideas,
    but aside from removing the windshield,
    any car, even with all windows rolled down,
    is going to get very very hot. A thermometer
    in the car on a 1-hour drive would show you
    how hot.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,071

    Post

    Good to spray abundant mist, bees cool by evaporation.
    Water is critical for cooling, and direct hot sunlight can cause catastrophic comb failure, so keep hives shaded, park in shade, and provide air so that the bees can circulate thru the hive.

    Lindauer didn't have an old Volvo to run the experiment, but he did stick a beehive on a lava field in Italy, in full sun. The exterior temperature was more than 70C (158F), (about as hot as the interior of your old volvo might get in the hot sun with windows closed) the bees were still able to maintain the internal hive temperature as long as they could collect water.

    Example is this colony in a barrel on a hot driveway during a steamy 90F day. The homeowner stated that hundreds of bees (likely from this colony alone), were in one solid mass one inch thick, on a wet rock in her fish pond, in a desperate attempt to provide enough moisture for adequate cooling. The effort failed, because I observed honey running from the bottom of the barrel, and some bees overheating dead on the driveway. The sunlight radiating thru the top probably caused the comb to fail at the anchoring points and fall to the bottom.

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/nature...2c.jpg&.src=ph

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Palestine, Tx. 75801
    Posts
    485

    Post

    I have been given 2-more hives that haven't been worked in several years. They are in fairly new hive equipment. They are about 2-1/2 hour from here. I am going to put the hives in my pickup for the move, and am going to take the hives apart and put back together in the back of the truck just before dark, so that they all will settle in. Should I do it now in the middle of the summer, or wait till fall when it is cooler?
    jrhelliott@gmail.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Palestine, Tx. 75801
    Posts
    485

    Post

    Excuse me, I didn't ask my question right. It would of course be more comfotable for me to wait until late fall for the bees to be in a cluster, instead of now at 100-degrees to move them. How would it affect the bees in the back of a pickup truck, crusing at 70-m.p.h. after dark for a 2-hour drive to the yard? I could wrap the hive in a cloth to keep the air movement down. What are your thoughts please?
    jrhelliott@gmail.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    At night in the back of a pickup I would not have any concern, especially using SBB's, and screen on the entrance. A screen top would be a good option if no screen bottom. Get er done!
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

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