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  1. #21

    Post

    Michael, that was a pretty good description of a "hot hive". AHB colonies are even worse. I've had to destroy one of my hives before - not a fun job but had to be done. They were attacking the mailman who delivers from his vehicle about a 100+ yards from the hive and of course, is only at the mailbox for a split second. (Gives new meaning to the term, "hot hive"!). I could not afford to wait the 30 to 60 days before the hive would calm down via re-queening. Killing the colony was my only option - which is the main point of this posting. Here's the best way to quickly kill a colony and retain the use of the equipment for more gentle stock. I used one of those plastic 'pump up' garden sprayers (usually in the 3-gallon range) mixed with a solution of dishwashing liquid (like Dawn or Ivory) to water (20:80 ratio, it's not too critical, but you want enough soap to due the job). Just about dusk, after the field forgers have returned, open the hive and spray them. Since the bees breathe through the spiricals on the sides of their bodies, the soap helps the water stick to their bodies and they sufficate very quickly (end of problem). The hive equipment is allowed to dry and can be reused without any problem.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,763

    Post

    The idea of killing them has crossed my mind, but thankfully I haven't needed to yet. It's good to know though. Raid would leave a lot of nasty residue.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Jameson, MO USA
    Posts
    76

    Post

    Sorry about the multiple post. I was having trouble with my browser, and I tried to delete the redundant posts, but couldn't.
    Joel

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    West Linn, OR, USA
    Posts
    1

    Question

    Help! I have a hive in my chimney! I'm not a beekeeper but I am hoping I can find someone to come take the queen and all of her little friends so that they will stop swarming me when I try to mow my lawn. I figure it's just a matter of time until they find their way into the house through an opening in the flough. Does anyone have any suggestions for me?
    These are honeybees and the nest seems to have at least 300-500 bees in it...at best count.
    signed,
    Becky

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Call your local county extension service or 911. Another place to call is county animal control. All these places should have a name and phone number for you to call to find a beekeeper willing to come and remove them.

    If we have to go to much trouble, expect to be charged. If it is a simple swarm in an easy to reach place, we generally come and get them for free.

    Bill

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,763

    Post

    Assuming it's only 300-500 then it doesn't sound like honey bees. It sounds like whatever they are, they are well set up in your chinmney and would not be easy to remove.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Bellingham WA USA
    Posts
    114

    Post

    ...though I hate to say it in case they ARE honeybees, most any pest control company can take care of them - by killing them - in case you don't get anyone to respond from the other options..

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Wink

    I had an interesting call the other day. A fellow had me come over to inspect his house and the bees living in his soffet.

    He wants them removed, not exterminated, because Hawks Interstate Exterminaters told him that they could not kill them as they are federally protected...

    O.K..., no argument from me.

    He is perfectly willing to pay me to remove them and have a construction company repair the damage. Two stories up, and I DON'T like heights.

    Whatever the customer wants. However, have you thought about just making a fire in your fireplace? That should take care of your problem.

    Bill

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
    Posts
    848

    Smile

    Bill: I know what you mean about heights.I took one out this weekend out of apartment that was 3 stories high.It is a very strong hive,also I price alot of my removal job's according to how long the bees has been there.along with other thing's, But alot of the time you can't count on the customer knowing how long they have been there,this hive was not but about 3 or 4 week's old.when I got in there the comb was about 4 feet long & 3 feet wide(3-4 week's old ?.I've got another hive to remove that's 3 story high.It's build on the outside of the building just hanging out in the wide open,It is a very very big,I'm really wanting this hive because this has got to be a strong hive of bees.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,763

    Post

    And since it's on the outside, it should be fairly straight forward.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Arnold, Peoples Republik of Maryland
    Posts
    31

    Post

    I'm a rookie with my first hive this spring and already I had the good? luck to experience the "banana" smell. The colony has been fine and a real pleasure to work with so far, but last weekend I was digging out an old stand of decorative grass and they came after me big time. Don't know what set them off. I was fairly close to the hive (about 15 feet) and had to chop at the roots a bit, so maybe the vibration or sound? Had to finish the job with veil and gloves. Repeated the process on some other plants slightly further from the hive and they left me alone. Seems like the bees have some kind of perimenter inside of which they don't like me fooling around with garden tools an such?

    One good thing, I've been doing hive inspections without gloves and hadn't been stung. At least now the suspense of wondering what if feels like is over

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,763

    Post

    >I'm a rookie with my first hive this spring and already I had the good? luck to experience the "banana" smell.

    Kind of like that "artificial bannana flavoring" smell.

    >I was fairly close to the hive (about 15 feet) and had to chop at the roots a bit, so maybe the vibration or sound?

    If I'm doing anything within 15 feet and get attacked, I consider that a hot hive.

    >Seems like the bees have some kind of perimenter inside of which they don't like me fooling around with garden tools an such?

    Yes, but a normal calm hive has a very small perimeter. Like the three feet in front of the hive or if it's open 15 feet around it.

    >At least now the suspense of wondering what if feels like is over

    Funny how it can be a relief.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Arnold, Peoples Republik of Maryland
    Posts
    31

    Post

    >If I'm doing anything within 15 feet and get attacked, I consider that a hot hive.

    Thanks Michael. O great. My first and, so far only, hive and it might be "hot". Do you think they could just be extra cranky from beeing stuck inside by all the rainy weather we've had out here?

    Just had another (probably dumb) thought. There was a large, well-established ant colony in the roots I was digging up. Is it possible that an ant alarm pheromone could cross species and disturb a honey bee colony?

    Bill

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,763

    Post

    I think it's more likely that the ants have been bothering them and getting them worked up than the pehromone. But I don't really know much about ant pheromones. If something bothers a hive on a regular basis they will get hot until that stress is removed. Most common causes are skunks and children with rocks.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    hey bill,i had a similar experience today,a lady had a swarm move into her walls,and a pest control place told her it was illegal to kill honeybees,she mentioned the name of the place so i called them.the owner described himself as a "beehugger",and said he just couldn't kill them.he was overjoyed when i told him he could call me to remove swarms.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    I had a church call me yesterday and i went over and found that the bees took residence in the cinder block wall behind the cross about thirty foot up.

    I told them to change their sermon Sunday to "God provides for all, great and small"

    Bill

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Neodesha, Ks
    Posts
    623

    Post

    Bill, your post about the bees in the church brought back memories of something I did in the early 70's. I was chairman of the Trustees at the church at 27th & Coolidge there in Wichita and we had bees in a wall simular to what you are speaking of. A fellow in church said he had a long ladder so I climbed up about 35' with a calking gun and calked the opening full, I guess the bees are still in there as we never saw them again. Now I am keeping bees, strange how what goes around comes around. Dale

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Neodesha, Ks
    Posts
    623

    Post

    Bill, your post about the bees in the church brought back memories of something I did in the early 70's. I was chairman of the Trustees at the church at 27th & Coolidge there in Wichita and we had bees in a wall simular to what you are speaking of. A fellow in church said he had a long ladder so I climbed up about 35' with a calking gun and calked the opening full, I guess the bees are still in there as we never saw them again. Now I am keeping bees, strange how what goes around comes around. Dale

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Neodesha, Ks
    Posts
    623

    Post

    Bill, Your post about the bees in the church brought back memories of something I did in the early 70's. I was chairman of the Trustees at the church at 27th & Coolidge there in Wichita and we had bees in a wall simular to what you are speaking of. A fellow in church said he had a long ladder so I climbed up about 35' with a calking gun and calked the opening full, I guess the bees are still in there as we never saw them again. Now I am keeping bees, strange how what goes around comes around. Dale

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Grifton, NC
    Posts
    1,302

    Post

    I helped a friend with 400-500 commercial hives back in 1992. He had bees scattered in various over a 50-mile radius. Several of the yards had some really mean inbred bees. It didn't take anything to set them off. He told me that they got that way because they were not requeened with fresh genetics regularly and each successive generation got meaner. I have a new hive with some feral bees I caught and some other bees I bought and they seem very gentle...so far.

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