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Thread: Russian Bees

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    Anyone know of a place to buy packages of russian bees?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    261

    Post

    They're kind of few and far between this year, in my experience. Probably going to have a tough time finding them this late.
    Central IL... where there are more hogs than people and more soybeans than hogs and people put together.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    I was going to buy 50 russian nucs, but am going to be going with carnolians because I can't find any russians...nucs, packages, or queens, for early season. Two weeks ago I had a source but when I finally decided what I was going to get last wednesday they were gone and none else to be found.

    BubbaBob

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    I wonder why?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Langley, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    413

    Post

    Chef Isaac

    >>>Topic: Queens from Canada (Buckfast)
    Fusion_power
    Field Bee


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I just got an email that Buckfast queens will be available from Davies Apiaries in Canada with a one time ship date of June 20th. Price is $17 each and a one time surcharge of $5 postage if less than 10 are ordered.

    I need about 5 queens and would be interested in seeing if anyone else in the North Alabama/Mississippi area would be interested in ordering a few at the same time. It looks like a larger order will be easier to handle as compared to several smaller ones.

    Fusion
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    Chef, yhe "why" is probably a combination of the extreme bee kill out west due to Varroa and the russian mite tolerance properties.

    BubbaBob

  7. #7

    Post

    I know of 2 people that are selling "pure" russian bees this spring and not the "hybrid" russians. We have bought hives and nucs from both the last 2 years that have done great. Do not think they sell packages and I am also not sure if they are booked up for the season or not. If you want more information email me.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    N.E. of Dallas, TX
    Posts
    9

    Post

    Any advise on installing russian queens? I bought four queens last year and only two were accepted. I was thinking about using a push-in cage from better bee. I have four more russian queens coming on 4/16/05.

  9. #9

    Post

    I have used both the push in cages and just the queen cage. If using the queen cage, it helps to leave in the cork(candy side) for a couple of days before uncorking it. Gives the bees more time to adjust.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,481

    Post

    A push in cage is the introductory standard by which everything else is measured. [img]smile.gif[/img] Easy enough to make one from #8 hardware cloth, or Betterbee and Brushy Mt. have plastic ones in their catalogs.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Post

    The push in cage is the best way ( I think) to introduce a queen. Place the cage and queen over some sealed brood that is about to emerge. The young bees will accept her as 'mom' and take care of her. Then as there are more young bees emerging and giving her cells, it give the new queen an area to lay eggs in. Once she starts to lay eggs the rest of the hive will accept her as their queen. You can then let her out. This takes up to a week but she will be in good shape and her phermones will be dispersed into the hive.
    Dan

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