Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: chalk brood

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Monte Vista, CO 81144
    Posts
    244

    Post

    has anyone found a cure for chalkbrood? What do you believe causes it? why does it clear up when a good honeyflow starts? just wondering.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Langley, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    413

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    I've had chalkbrood in a few hives this year- the spores that cause it are around all the time and environmental conditions will trigger an episode- cold, wet weather, and poor ventilation all contribute to chalk, and a weak colony is more susceptable than a strong one because they have a hard time keeping the brood nest warm. In one case I actually rehived the bees into a 4 frame NUC for a couple of weeks. They're back in a deep now and doing well.

    A good honey flow pretty much means you're having a stretch of nice clear sunny weather- just what it takes to help clear up chalkbrood.

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,379

    Post

    >a cure for chaulkbrood

    Put the hive in the sun, give it adequate, but not excessive ventilation. It usually clears right up.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Monte Vista, CO 81144
    Posts
    244

    Post

    Thanks all, and great link Terry.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Ozark, Missouri
    Posts
    27

    Post

    I had a problem with chalkbrood this year in a new nuc. Following the advice of several on the board I made sure it had light and ventilation. It took a few weeks, but cleared up.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,379

    Post

    >What do you believe causes it?

    I think it's a combiniation of things. Lack of heat, high humidity, too much or too little ventilation.

    The "scientific" answer is the spore-forming fungus, Ascophaera apis. That's what grows on the brood under certain conditions.

    >why does it clear up when a good honeyflow starts?

    The weather warms up. It rains less. The bees get more active. Things change.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    Do what the bees do. When something goes wrong, change the queen. Seriously, some queens are prone to it. If the combs hold a lot of it scrap them and give new stuff. It's usually a spring problem but I have lost hives to it.

    Dickm

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Monte Vista, CO 81144
    Posts
    244

    Post

    thanks all,


    Indeed it seems to be a spring problem. I winter my bees in the desert and when I bring my nucs up to Colorado in the spring ( early May) they seem to struggle with chalk brood. But as soon as the weather straightens out every thing that isn't dead, clears up.

    cheers,

    simplyhoney

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads