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Thread: Checkerboarding

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    southeastern Illinois
    Posts
    38

    Post

    I'm a little late on this conversation but I have been checking my own opinions against those of local turkey hunters and other outdoorsmen as to the average dates of hardwood greenup and red bud bloom. We could all agree that for us, red bud bloom is the last week of March to the first of April with hardwood green up 2 to 3 weeks later. However, this year will probably be way earlier than average. It just seems to come down to this, we have to look at the plants and in the hives and make our best guess. A prayer won't hurt either. All I really know about beekeeping is that there is a lot more for me to learn. Note to Hill's Hivery of Olney IL. I am very close to you and would enjoy getting acquainted because i always enjoy meeting other beekeepers.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >Maybe dandelions?

    Probably grain dust from bird feeders, or catle troughs.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,881

    Post

    www.pollen.com puts our pollen at 2.7 tomorrow. The source is listed as "mixed trace".

    The trees are budding, but so far I haven't see the elms or maples blooming.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post

    I have seen a few dandelions blooming, I have never seen that in January but this year was the warmest January since they have been keeping records in southwest Michigan . We were 12.6 degrees above the normal means temps. I’m trying not to be too anxious I think February will have some surprises in store.
    Back to checkerboarding how do you intra grate new foundation using this method?
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
    Posts
    1,443

    Post

    Can someone describe that "split load" thing? any pics?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Madisonville, Texas
    Posts
    438

    Post

    A split - load as I have learned from reading is when bees bring in pollen from blooming plants and nectar from flowers. Pollen for the brood nectar for honey. I do not have a pic of a bee. They would have the pollen on the legs and a belly full of nectar.

    Craig
    ;) Good Day Craig W.<br /><a href=\"http://www.weaversproduce.mysite.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.weaversproduce.mysite.com</a>

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
    Posts
    1,443

    Post

    i'm thinking there has got to be a way to tell, like we spot verroa, like the nasanov, etc. Just looking for some guidance.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Elkton, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    288

    Post

    Ford Guy (indications of split loads)

    This question was answered earlier with what I considered a bad answer, but thought I would let you guys work it out.
    The split load giveaway is multiple bees coming in with small pollen loads. You know what a full pollen load looks like when the bee is only foraging for pollen. If a short flight distance, the pollen is a veritable ball. Longer flight distances will often erode the ball into a tapered aerodynamic shape, but it is still large and prominent. In the early season, late in the short workday, some pollen foragers will quit and go home with less than a full pollen load. All the bees in a colony are not on the same mission at any one time. Some forage for water, nectar, and/or pollen. You have to watch long enough to see a cross section of returning foragers. Sometimes different mission foragers come in waves.
    At midday, when you see large numbers of foragers with short pollen loads, you can bet they are split-loaders. The abdomen is not as plump as the liquid carriers, but shows some filling of their tanks. It’s difficult to focus on the hustling, returning forager. She’s in a hurry. But short pollen loads are fairly obvious.
    One season, years ago, my bees were bringing mostly nectar, with the slightest amount of a reddish brown pollen. Some had a small bead of pollen in their baskets, and other just had some coloration up the hind leg. Don’t know the source, but suspect skunk cabbage. This past mild January, saw a hint of the same thing, but didn’t take time to examine it closely. Addressing your question gives me the opportunity to ask beeks who might know: What is the color of skunk cabbage pollen, or what very early source is reddish brown?
    One last note relevant to this thread: CB induces higher incidence of split loads. In the early season, foraging for pollen is the primary colony focus to provide brood food. The colony that has been CB’ed has the additional drive to fill perceived empty comb overhead. The dual motivation generally encourages foraging for both pollen and nectar at the same time.

    Walt

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