Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Shiner, Texas
    Posts
    15

    Question

    Thanks again to all those great replies to my original two questions!

    Today, I verified that the hive IS queenless (and still cram-packed with bees!), then I checkerboarded the three full sized brood chamber boxes to the best of my ability. The two upper boxes are now configured approximately FFPBBBPFF and the bottom box is mostly full of old honey. I had NO brood or eggs, so the brood comb is mostly empty. I hope that's a satisfactory configuration for the hive. If not, please advise what I need to change.

    I have a new queen (in cage) which I want to introduce tomorrow after the bees have settled down from todays re-arrangement. NOW MY QUESTION: Where (which hive box of the three) should I place the queen cage?

    Since it's the middle of the honey flow here, I plan to add a cut comb super after the queen is laying.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,553

    Post

    >Today, I verified that the hive IS queenless (and still cram-packed with bees!)

    What method verified that it is queenless? A frame of eggs and they started queen cells?

    >I have a new queen (in cage) which I want to introduce tomorrow after the bees have settled down from todays re-arrangement. NOW MY QUESTION: Where (which hive box of the three) should I place the queen cage?

    Where the bees are clustered the thickest.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Shiner, Texas
    Posts
    15

    Post

    Thanks Michael!

    You asked:
    >What method verified that it is queenless? A frame of eggs and they started queen cells?

    I should have said it was verified queenless to the best I could do by very careful inspection. I only have this one hive at this time.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,553

    Post

    I would not consider not finding a queen as verification that they are queenless. Not by any means. A lack of brood does not verify they are queenless. Not by any means. An emergency or superceudre queen could be there and not laying yet and be very hard to find and there could be no eggs or brood (capped or uncapped) whatsoever.

    No eggs, and no queen cell started on a frame of eggs and brood would be good evidence there is a queen that isn't laying. A frame of eggs and brood that gets queen cells started on it, is good evidence they are queenless.

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmath.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Shiner, Texas
    Posts
    15

    Post

    >> A frame of eggs and brood that gets queen cells started on it, is good evidence they are queenless.

    That's a great idea, which I will keep on file for future use.

    But since I have only one hive and at this time don't have access to a frame of eggs, I had to rely on eyesight. I DO understand the falicy in my method though.

    A week ago, I had found queen cells being started from what looked like from brood cells and suspecting they were queenless then, I removed those queen cells & ordered a new queen. Didn't want a natural replacement of the queen because I live in AHB territory & also wanted a marked queen since being a novice, I feel I probably would have difficulty finding an unmarked queen.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,553

    Post

    >A week ago, I had found queen cells being started from what looked like from brood cells and suspecting they were queenless then, I removed those queen cells & ordered a new queen.

    That's evidence they were going to replace a queen. But the queen they were replacing may still be there and they may reject the new one. I would never conisder not finding a queen proof that she isn't there, and I'm very good at finding them. I find twenty or thirty a week. Most of them unmarked and many of them very flighty and trying to hide. Sometimes you can't find a queen you KNOW is there in a two frame medium depth nuc.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads