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Thread: Finally Pollen

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,121

    Exclamation

    Finally the boxelder has popped and the girls are bringing in loads of pollen.

    yeee haaaa
    Closing in on retirement.......

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,966

    Post

    gosh sundance, with full supers here your girls must be a laggin'...

    and ain't boxelder's a tree? now I don't remember ANY of those when I did my tour of duty in north dakota.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    I only remember trees right around the houses when I was there But pelicans EVERYWHERE!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    50,040

    Post

    Odd, but true. Pelicans migrate through here, in Nebraska also.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 41y 200h 38yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    Yep, a buddy and I left WI around midnight and got to ND as dawn was breaking, I was on no sleep and started noticing all these big, white birds wherever there was a pool of water, thought I was hallucinating for a while.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,121

    Post

    Loads of Pelicans, and Tundra Swans. Both gorgeous!!

    Loads of trees here as I am on a lake. Most abundant are Boxelder which is a maple in reality.

    Boxelder Aceraceae Acer negundo L.

    Leaf: Opposite, pinnately compound, 3 to 5 leaflets (sometimes 7), 2 to 4 inches long, margin coarsely serrate or somewhat lobed, shape variable but leaflets often resemble a classic maple leaf, light green above and paler below.

    Flower: Dioecious; yellow-green, in drooping racemes; appearing in spring.

    Fruit: Paired V-shaped samaras, 1 to 1 1/2 inches long, in drooping clusters,light tan when ripe in fall, persist throughout winter.

    Twig: Green to purplish green, moderately stout, leaf scars narrow, meeting in raised points, often covered with a glaucous bloom; buds white and hairy, lateral buds appressed.

    Bark: Thin, gray to light brown, with shallow interlacing ridges; young bark is generally warty.

    Form: Medium sized tree to 60 feet, typically with poor form and multiple trunks; sprouts often occur on bole.
    Closing in on retirement.......

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    You forgot "prone to rot" and "highly invasive" [img]smile.gif[/img]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,121

    Post

    Highly invasive for sure. Surprizingly good fire wood as I have learned the past 2 winters. More creasote than I like, but it's free.

    Box Elder got its name from the fact it was used a great deal for making boxes in the old days. What a tidbit.......
    Closing in on retirement.......

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,121

    Post

    In the rot department it is simular to Poplar/Aspen. With the bark on it will get punky. Bark off and it is amazingly good.

    I made my last 15 Nuc's from Box Elder
    Closing in on retirement.......

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