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Thread: Finally Pollen

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Exclamation

    Finally the boxelder has popped and the girls are bringing in loads of pollen.

    yeee haaaa

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Post

    gosh sundance, with full supers here your girls must be a laggin'...

    and ain't boxelder's a tree? now I don't remember ANY of those when I did my tour of duty in north dakota.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    I only remember trees right around the houses when I was there But pelicans EVERYWHERE!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,889

    Post

    Odd, but true. Pelicans migrate through here, in Nebraska also.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    Yep, a buddy and I left WI around midnight and got to ND as dawn was breaking, I was on no sleep and started noticing all these big, white birds wherever there was a pool of water, thought I was hallucinating for a while.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Loads of Pelicans, and Tundra Swans. Both gorgeous!!

    Loads of trees here as I am on a lake. Most abundant are Boxelder which is a maple in reality.

    Boxelder Aceraceae Acer negundo L.

    Leaf: Opposite, pinnately compound, 3 to 5 leaflets (sometimes 7), 2 to 4 inches long, margin coarsely serrate or somewhat lobed, shape variable but leaflets often resemble a classic maple leaf, light green above and paler below.

    Flower: Dioecious; yellow-green, in drooping racemes; appearing in spring.

    Fruit: Paired V-shaped samaras, 1 to 1 1/2 inches long, in drooping clusters,light tan when ripe in fall, persist throughout winter.

    Twig: Green to purplish green, moderately stout, leaf scars narrow, meeting in raised points, often covered with a glaucous bloom; buds white and hairy, lateral buds appressed.

    Bark: Thin, gray to light brown, with shallow interlacing ridges; young bark is generally warty.

    Form: Medium sized tree to 60 feet, typically with poor form and multiple trunks; sprouts often occur on bole.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    You forgot "prone to rot" and "highly invasive" [img]smile.gif[/img]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Highly invasive for sure. Surprizingly good fire wood as I have learned the past 2 winters. More creasote than I like, but it's free.

    Box Elder got its name from the fact it was used a great deal for making boxes in the old days. What a tidbit.......

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    In the rot department it is simular to Poplar/Aspen. With the bark on it will get punky. Bark off and it is amazingly good.

    I made my last 15 Nuc's from Box Elder

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