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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Soso, MS, USA
    Posts
    7

    Post

    Last Saturday I learned that my uncle had a wild hive that had moved into a box at his dog yard. He gave them to me if I would come get them. Sunday afternoon, my son and I drove the 30 miles to transfer them into a standard hive body. I used plenty of smoke and the bees seemed to be fairly calm through most of the moving. The box, or rather cabinet, had a hinged door and it was eaisy to gain access to the hive. Judging from the size of the comb, this looks to be a new swarm that moved into the box this spring. I cut the comb off the inside of the box and used cotton string pulled tight and stapled to the frames to support the comb that I transferred. Everything went well and I had a large number of bees in the new hive in a couple of hours. It wasn't until later that I realized that I had put the comb into the foundations upside down. The flat cut that I made at the top of the comb just seemed to fit well on the bottom of the frame. I left the hive at that location to give the bees time to move in before I moved them to my home. My question: "Will the bees abandon the upside down comb?" BTW, I never found the queen. I hope she was on the comb that I transferred to the hive body.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Post

    Actually I'm glad you did that. Yes they will abandon the old comb after the brood hatches out. I would also give them another box on top with foundation. The bees will move into that and draw out the comb like its suppose to be. This is another 'trick' the old timers use to do. Cut down a bee tree and turn it upside down placing a box with foundation on top and allow the bees to take up house keeping.
    Good luck and have fun.
    Dan

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Soso, MS, USA
    Posts
    7

    Post

    Thanks Bjerm2. I suppose luck counts so this may work out. I didn't know how big the colony was so I took two hive bodies with me. I left both bodies there with the frames, complete with foundation.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,803

    Post

    I found this spring that bees DO NOT abandon upside down comb. I turned two supers full of wild comb upside down, put drawn comb above, the queen did not move up.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Post

    Well, how much brood was in the comb and how much honey? The queen does not like to lay in reverse cells and the nector has a problem staying in it. I admit its a long process say a month or two but they will brake down the comb and redo it. That's personal experiance and also what I have read in XYZ in Bee Culture plus several other articles.
    Dan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,408

    Post

    They CAN rework it and sometimes they do. I've also seen them abandon it. Of course they are more likely to abandon upside down comb for drawn good comb. Less likely to abandon it for undrawn foundation.

    I've always tied it in right side up, but at this point I'd keep adding new frames in the middle and moving the old ones to the outside as the brood emerges you can pull it out.

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