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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Delta, British Colombia, Canada
    Posts
    44

    Post

    Well I started out with only 3 hives in the back yard and 7 at the farm not a big problem. I have now had to do splits and now have 9 hives in the backyard alone and will have a number of queenÂ’s ready soon or so I hope (the queen cells are capped). At the rate these bees need to be split my urban yard will soon be engulfed in bees. I plan on making new colonies by waiting for the queens to hatch and mate then capture them with the bees in the nucs and make new colonies by splitting frames of brood and bees from the big colonies at the farm and combine . The only reason for this transfer of bees and queens only is to avoid transfer of disease as chalk brood has become prevalent and also I can kill any varroa by using a sugar shake on the bees from the nucs. My question is how do I do a sugar shake and how do I get a queen to go into a queen cage? I would just transfer the frames and bees to the farm but disease and a desperate need for drawn frames at my home bee yard make this unpractical. I have seen on the internet a video of people knocking the bees off a frame into a container which I guesses could be used to do the sugar shake but I am unsure of were or how I should do this any advice would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    >how do I do a sugar shake

    I'd put them in a hive box with screen on the bottom (a screened bottom board with the entrance blocked could work) and an inner cover with the hole screened also. I'd staple or nail it all toegether well and flip it upside down and dump a cup or more of powdered suger in from the SBB and shake them until they are well coated.

    >how do I get a queen to go into a queen cage?

    It takes a lot of practice to get a queen in a cage. Practice for manipulated queens is best practiced on drones. If you have a three hole cage then I'd remove the staples for the screen and then the screen, put the queen in and add the screen and staple it back on. If you put the queen in a box with the bees having access you won't have to have attendants. If you have a plastic cage, then flip the whole top open and put her in that way. If you don't want to catch her, you can sometimes guide her in with your hands. If you buy a hair clip queen catcher you can pick her up off the combs and take her in a closed room with a window and work with her there so she doesn't fly off. I use the bathroom.

    >I have seen on the internet a video of people knocking the bees off a frame into a container which I guess could be used to do the sugar shake but I am unsure of were or how I should do this

    To knock bees off of a frame you have to shift gears from slow, smooth and gentle to sudden, quick and decisive. If you mist them with some water first they will fly less but the water may interfere with the powdered sugar treatment.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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