Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Wetumpka ,Alabama
    Posts
    510

    Question

    Any one use any form of bee keeping insurance?What company,price?Good points?Bad points?
    I figure most insurance companies would not insure bee hives other than the box itself against theft or natural causes.But have seen some in the north I think that do insure against deadouts and pest.

    Have been un able to find anyone here in the south.

    oh yeah not to mention that the price would be too high for most hobbist and small operations.

    Thanks.
    If you build it they will comb it.<br />Tim Rolan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    If you can insure against deadouts, you're not a hobbiest. A true hobbiest is insured against liability and vandalism by his homeowners insurance. (Maybe even if they don't know about the bees.) These decisions are, of course, made by a court.

    If you're taking losses in your income tax, it's a business. Not a hobby. Can't advise that yet. Sorry,

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    Ever see the 911 episode where the bee truck is flipped on the highway and everyone is running around waving their arms like it's the last bus for the 2nd coming of Christ? That's what you need insurance for. Ever have someone trip over a tent rope at the farmers market or chip a jar while moving glassware about to be filled, that's what you need insurance for. Ever had a container of beeswax flash in the honey house lighting up your yard like Haleys comet run aground? Insurance, insurance, insurance. We carry 1,000,000 product and 1,000,000 business through a New York Company. We market in NYC which has skyscrapers full of attorneys waiting for one of my customers to bite into a comb honey and choke (hopefully to death) on a piece of propolis. There was an outfit out of Denver offering policies in ABJ for years, maybe still. They are not licensed in all states, including mine. Your other losses unless you have a large operation will be under or close to a deductable and in many cases not insurable.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,081

    Post

    Most insurance if you can get it would be cancelled after the first claim, concerning loss or theft. I think most I talked too were mainly concerned about product liability in regards to lawsuits.

    The way you have a business structured can be your first line of defense. LLC, Incorporated, etc.

    The second would be insurance. Product liability is my main concern. I think thats where the main threat comes from. At least on the east coast, if anyone has access to the "Lancaster Farming" newspaper, it lists insurance companies that deal with agriculture and other hard to insure businesses.

    Other than that, perhaps a call to the state agriculture department might be helpfull. Insurance companies also know each other. Call one and ask. If they can't handle the insurance ask if they know who may be able too.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    39

    Post

    I read online somewhere that you can pay the government a few bucks for insurance. If an approved pesticide wipes out your bees you get some compensation.

    Sorry but I can't find the item just now. Has anyone else seen it?

    Best,
    Tom
    <a href=\"http://beenews.blogspot.com\" target=\"_blank\">Bee News</a>

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    915

    Post

    We are insured through Country Mutual Insurance with a farm policy called, "Agri-Plus".
    it covers the farm dwelling, shops, outbuildings, equipment,bees, tractors, liability, business, you name it....
    Its a bit spendy, and we cose it because we were under the impression that it was the only ins company that would insure beekeeping operations.
    WRONG!!!!
    I went to an agriculture EXPO last month that had several insurance companys that claimed to insure beekeeping outfits.
    As Vice President of the OSBA, I was able to call any bluff by asking, "Who do you insure locally?"
    Sure enough, they had the names!
    Shop around.
    Insure through a company that presents a well rounded policy.
    Don't fall for the, "Bees??? Oh, that is a whole different category of......"
    As far as winter kill ins; i wm not interested in any thing like that.
    We as beekeepers are the only policy hedging that.
    I have exactly ONE hive more than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond question.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    San Lorenzo, NM, USA
    Posts
    104

    Post

    When I shopped around, I had extreme difficulty even finding an insurer offering bee insurance. I tried all the local insurance agencies AND the insurer I had been using for years for homeowner coverage. Internet searches did not produce results.

    I tried ABJ which still provides insurances for its members. But, alas, as mentioned by JOEL, their agent in Colorado is not licensed in NM.

    Eventually, I did learn that The Hartford provides coverage at two levels: basic and "business owner." The basic coverage includes public liability, product liability, advertising injury, fire and medical expenses. The business coverage adds equipment, facilities and loss of income. However, neither plan covers equipment exposed to the elements (meaning any equipment exposed to weather). If you are interested in pursuing this lead, contact Gerry Cantu, San Antonio, TX, at 877-495-8542, ext. 4355. He can more fully describe the coverages and provide you a premium quote over the telephone. Premiums are largely based on the estimated sales revenue you forcast for the year. I understand that the minimum premium for basic is $350, $500 for business owner's.

    I would caution those depending upon their homeowner's policy to be careful. I spoke candidly with my agent and found MANY areas of possible conflict if I were to file a claim. Because I sell my hive products and maintain several outyards, it's realisticly a stretch to consider my operation as a home based business or hobby. Consequently, I expect problems with product and public liabliilty coverage protection through my honeowner's policy. But, I would expect proetection through my homeowner's for my woodshop and the woodenware stored in an outbuilding at my home place.

    At present, I am not "fully" insured and am still looking for other insurance options. Any leads would be appreciated.
    Bob Bleakley, Mimbres Valley Honey

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    New Albany, Ohio
    Posts
    350

    Post

    I found out that, in order to participate in our local farmers market, I had to carry a $1M liability insurance policy. I used the same company that insures our home and autos since I already knew my agent and since they had a commercial division. It's not very expensive, all things considered. Keeps us covered if someone is stung or has an "allergic" reaction to our honey or products and sues.

    Sad to say that, in this day and age, you have to have legal protection. Especially if you're dealing with the public.

    There's been articles in Bee Culture about it. You could probably e-mail them for a reprint or order a back issue.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    Loyd's of London will insure almost anything if you can pay the premiums.
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,790

    Post

    &gt;&gt;if you can pay the premiums.

    I think that's the key point. IF you could find someone willing to insure against deadouts, I imagine the premiums would just about break you. When I was working as a photojournalist a few years ago, I checked on policies to cover my cameras and other equipment. The policy cost 1/3 each year of the original cost of my equipment. Obviously, if I broke all of my equipment or had everything stolen once every three years or more frequently, the insurance might have made financial sense.

    In other words, if you're insuring $500 worth of beehives, but the insurance costs you (assuming the company covers itself so it's not losing money) $250 annually, is it worth the price of the policy?

    Liability insurance makes sense and is almost certainly a lot more affordable.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Post

    I went into my home/auto insurance agent, knowing full well he wouldn't touch me with a ten foot pole. But I explained exactly what I was looking for and he looked around for me.

    Naturally, he explained why he couldn't cover me--which is what I expected--but he lined me up with a local agent who does commercial insurance. He shopped the market for me and found an agency that would give me product and premises liability. It was new ground for them, and you'll have to do some education.

    I also joined the ABF because certain insurance agencies will cover ABF members. After several phone calls and letters that went ignored, I gave up on them...and the ABF.

    Keep looking. Insurance is available at resonable costs.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    &gt; After several phone calls and letters that went
    &gt; ignored, I gave up on them...and the ABF.

    Funny, same thing happened to me with ABF.
    My reaction was about the same. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Farm Bureau, at least in Virgina, has no
    problem at all with a farm with 15 million
    "head" of tiny little livestock.

    Sure they can sting, but cattle can wreck
    gardens, and horses can stomp the heck out
    of someone. The trick is walking your
    insurance agent down a row of hives, letting
    him or her notice the thousands of sorties
    per minute, and notice that not a single bee
    is the least interested in him/her.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    Try Loyds Of London, they'll insure a singers butt for 5 billion ,why not your bees?? they're the insurance company alot of actors go thru, and museums when shipping art.
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,069

    Post

    I found this site in a web search.

    Coverage available in South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska and Montana.

    http://www.howaltmcdowell.com/defaul...5&menukey1=101


    I do not know this person or have any connection with this group. I found this as I am also looking for insurance unfortunately they don't cover my state. I don't know what their costs are but hey if you live in one of those states an email won't cost you much.

    Now I just need to find some for Indiana.

    [size="1"][ December 29, 2005, 07:41 AM: Message edited by: dtwilliamson ][/size]
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,790

    Post

    I don't imagine that any of these will insure against dead-outs or pests, though. That was part of the original post, at least suggesting that some insurers in the north will cover beekeepers against dead-outs and pests.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads