Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,349

    Post

    Last summer we had a lengthy discussion on the impact of the spread of AHB due to hives coming out of almond pollination and accross the country. I've heard the spread may be not from the suspected source although I've seen nothing published to contradict the cause of that spread which now seems to be at a crisis level in Florida. I think since this will undoubtably be a significant impact on beekeeping in the eastern 1/2 of the country if not the whole country here is the place to post what we know, what we think and how we will deal with oncoming changes to our industry. I think the following areas need to be aired.

    1) What is the actual situation in Florida (Rob you out there, can you share with us? Other beekeepers in Fl?) How large and area are we talking about today and does USDA have any updatd maps (links).

    2) What will be the likely spread and How. (along the I-95 Corridor like SHB?, according to target pollination crops?)

    3) Where will they spread ( what lattitude, climates are they likely to establish in. Will they be able to spread in northern area over summers through swarms damaging northern stock, Arkansas, Mississippi?)

    4) How long until Current breeders in southern states are affected, where will northern beekeepers go for stock able to survive winters in in infected but non-wintering areas.

    5) What managment methods will we need to change to best effect our future in beekeeping.

    6) Have AHB in South America been successfully inbred with EHB's or it is pretty much not going to happen?

    Just a few of my questions. I would like to help develop the Dark Winter Scenerio and work back from there together. I plan to survive this change although I think it will be more difficult than any we've yet faced.

    There comes a time when we have to put the baggies and condiments aside and move on!!

    [size="1"][ December 18, 2005, 10:52 AM: Message edited by: Joel ][/size]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    chatsworth, calif usa
    Posts
    405

    Post

    I would hope that Tomas (15 years working AHB in Honduras) would include his perspective in developing the DWS. Hello, Tom?
    My Mom's other kids are smarter than me, but i'm not nearly as nice.

  3. #3

    Post

    Last week, I sent an email to one of the Federal agencies in Arizona requesting a current distribution map of the AHB for an envirnomental assessment I am working on. The most recent maps for the state were dated circa 2003 and were pretty basic.

    I found the following on Google. The first dated 2003 which does not include the AHB's range in Louisiana.

    The second link contains county/parish distribution maps of the southeastern and southwestern US where the AHB has been either confirmed or reported.

    2003 US Range Map

    http://nationalatlas.gov/mld/afrbeep.html

    2005 Southeastern and Southwestern County/Parish Range map

    http://www.lsuagcenter.com/en/enviro...ember+2005.htm
    James Henderson
    Golden Delight Honey; 225-803-5406 (cell)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
    Posts
    629

    Post

    Joel,
    1. The AHb in Florida is a different critter. The genetics are showing almost pure Scutellata which is not surprising as they reportedly have originated off ships from South Africa. The AHB we have seen in Arizona & Texas has been tamed somewhat by the huge number of European hives they have encountered since 1957 for the most part.

    Very very aggresive is the way beekeepers are speaking about AHB in Florida.
    Tampa/Miami area is the location most spoke of. Actually few large commercial beekeepers are in the area but farther north & east. They do move into the Brazilian pepper areas in winter but little swarming is being done by AHB then. Orange is farther north and around frostprrof ,Florida.
    Florida is a big state and take around 10-12 hours (guess)to drive from the northern border to Key West. 12-14 from the western border to Key West. You can cross Missouri from north to south in 4-5 hours. East to west in 3-4 hours.
    There is cause for concern in Florida but not panic.
    5. locations for large amounts of hives will need to be moved unless absolute control over aggressive hives is done. Loads of bees will need to be neted even by small beekeepers while in transit. We never net loads less than 200 hives in Missouri. I also imagine signs will be posted saying loads of bees can not be moved through cities except at night or on the truck route. Jerry Hayes will be very exacting I would imagine with the new regulations.
    To Florida beekeepers reading what I am saying please follow the new rules. Bad PR is not good! The Florida newspapers will put bee problems on the back page next to shark attacks unless beekeeper carelessness is the problem. Use care when moving bees and using yards.
    In Sanford, Florida the locals hand dug deep trenches in the beekeepers roads going into his yards. Illegal but you can see how hated his hives were to the locals! The beekeeper finally gave up the yards to prevent violence which was being threatened by the locals.
    The beekeepers point of view was he had used those yards for the last forty years and what dummy would build a subdivision a stones throw from 600 hives of bees?
    Bob Harrison

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    Why aren't we hearing more about AHB in Southern CA? I would have expected that there would be more "incidents" reported in such a densely populated area, especially because it seems like prime AHB habitat.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
    Posts
    629

    Post

    You are not going to hear about AHB in commercial operations. Why would you?

    The Florida inspection service kind of stumbled on the AHB in LaBelle I was told. I don't remember the exact number of hives which tested positive for AHB but I believe over 50.

    My friends in Texas do not call the bee lab every time they get a "hot" hive they simply solve the problem.

    The only time you will ever hear of a stinging incident is when the news media show up. Not even a front page item unless a person dies in Arizona.

    Every commercial beekeeper I ever met is more concerned about varroa than AHB.
    Bob Harrison

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,349

    Post

    James & Rob, Thanks for the input. I quess I've looked at AHB as inevitable for years. Rob I think your observations about the impact from public opinion are well founded. As the problem spreads if public opinon changes and insurance companies start dropping bee operations I would expect Commercial operators will have a different level of concern.


    My NYC markets are done now until March so I'm going to spend some time doing some research on what has happened in South America and get a better insight on Scutella.

    Migratory operations will have the option to winter hives in the South where AHB will survive and be viable for pollination. I am interested to find out what the dilution rate is to breed out AHB traits, if it is possible looking at the spread accross South America. Also the issue of finding isolated yards. Most of my yards are near enough to farm operations that involve running tractors, combines (our buckwheat yards along the fingerlakes for example), or areas frequented by hunters. What will happen as far as insurance concerns, I assume as Rob indicates it will be a don't ask don't tell.

    I figure it's best to get the possiblities on the table which will allow everyone to look at it and get out any ideas. We no doubt will not be able to change the spread but we could affect the impact. I expect as more bee suppliers become aficanized and the supply becomes tighter those unprepared will leave the industry.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
    Posts
    629

    Post

    Joel,
    One of the best things about these forums is the fast way you can keep up on what is going on in a fast changing beekeeping industry. Takes a couple months for information to reach publication in the U.S. bee magazines unless the publisher knows the article will be coming and on time. I have had mine go to publication in a few weeks with industry important information.
    Granted there are not many commercial beekeepers on the list but the few there are can keep informed.

    AHB is fast moving north from Texas. Here is a report from The Arkansas beekeepers meeting and published by Tim Tucker in the Kansas Honey Producers newsletter.

    "While in Arkansas for the annual meeting (Tim was a speaker), I had the opportunity to meet several people from around the state who are now dealing with AHB. AHB is now located in *22* counties in Arkansas with Crawford & Johnson being the Northern most counties effected which is approx. 100 miles south of the Kansas border. AHB has been moving north into Oklahoma and is expected to reach the Kansas border within the next few years" (Dec. 2005 KHPA newsletter pg. 2 by Tim Tucker)

    The above agrees with what I said in an earlier post. Commercial beekeepers are dealing with AHB. Not calling apiary inspectors and especially not calling news media.
    Bob Harrison

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads