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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Winnipeg Manitoba
    Posts
    311

    Post

    I'm sorry, but I cant find the thread where I promised I'd post the results of this experiment I tried earlier this summer.

    I attempted to requeen 12 hives using queen cells without removing/ killing the old queen 1st.

    The sucess rate was 8 out of 12.

    However, 2 of them squirted up though the queen excluder ( God knows how.....are they smaller when just hatched, before their wings harden? ) To form double queen hives.

    A few folks had expressed intrest on what would happen, so here it is as prommised.

    John Russell

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    A little searching found it in Queen and Bee Breeding:

    http://www.beesource.com/cgi-bin/ubb...=000341#000000

    Congratulations. Your results were significantly better than anyone expected- most people predicted abject failure! Not only did you beat the odds, you did as well or better than many people obtain by more conventional means.

    Where was your queen excluder and what have you done with the double queen hives?

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,320

    Post

    >However, 2 of them squirted up though the queen excluder ( God knows how.....are they smaller when just hatched, before their wings harden? )

    Yes the virgins are smaller. I've had them run right through the "excluder" of a hair clip queen catcher like it wasn't even there.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,068

    Post

    >> attempted to requeen 12 hives using queen cells without removing/ killing the old queen 1st.

    Thanks for sharing your results.
    Was the original queen marked? I'm assuming it was but just interested for clarification. I put a capped queen cell in a queen-right hive recently but to no avail. They tore down the queen cell before she hatched. I hate to waste the cells. Unless I see a higher success rate I think I'd still rather let them hatch in a nuc and then recombine.

    Dan
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    <<They tore down the queen cell before she hatched.>>

    At HAS, David Eyre said a protector would take care of that, and once the virgin emerged she was safe from the workers.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,320

    Post

    A piece of aluminum foil wrapped around the queen cell with the end left open will work for a cell protector. Or, of course, you can buy them. I usually don't use them and they usually don't tear them down.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Winnipeg Manitoba
    Posts
    311

    Post

    Queen excluder was above the single brood chamber. Queens were not marked but the breeds have
    very distinctive color diferences. ( The new ones are almost black with very little yellow...)
    Still running the double queen hives as is, producing quite nicely. Queen cell protectors were used in this case.

    Thanks for all the advice and feedback guys.

    J.Russell

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