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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    David says......."Gameboy and the tube are some of the worst enemies for the outdoors and real life."

    Isn't that the truth. It is quite a coincidence you bring this up as I was just talking with my wife and I am shutting down the Direct TV tomorrow morning.

    Going to be withdrawl here folks. Do they have TVA??? (television ananomous)

    Seriously it steals way to much time from me.

    I will still be able to get ABC and PBS on regular antenna (with snow) for weather and news. And of course there is the internet.....

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,046

    Post

    I've had that same experience Stewaw. Even got a used second veil/hat for onlookers, but so far no takers! The two most interested friends I'm hoping might dive in this spring. I also have had a few neighbors tell stories about the beek from their grandpas farm or the hives by where they played as kids... I keep those contacts up for the day a neighbor freaks out.

    Maybe I'll contact our local troop and see what the scoop is. Is the beek merit badge still active?

    And Hawk & Sundance I love your attitude... make it happen brothers. Good on you both!
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    953

    Post

    One idea is to have your local club offer a junior beekeeping class. The GA Beekeeping Assn. offered one a few weeks ago and drew about 25-30 kids. They were split up into two groups and got a classroom portion and a field portion where the kids nailed together a hive body and then donned gloves and a veil, lit a smoker, and checked out a few hives. The kids had a blast (as did the parents), especially when the instructor grabbed a worker bee and pursposely got stung on the arm to show that it's not the end of the world.

    The last thing they did was pass out Brushy Mtn catalogs to all the parents to order bee stuff for next spring. Not sure how many will become beekeepers, but they are certainly more educated than they were.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    65

    Post

    I've been watching the BeeSource.com membership grow over the past few months. With each passing day, the numbers have grown to over 3,000 individuals. I know not all these folks have bees, but it should help us all to realize that there is still much interest out there in beekeeping.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    I would have to say that it starts with one of two things.... 1) a person willign to teach and/or 2) a club who is active in teaching and humble.

    This is not to offend anyone...

    When I was living in Eugene, they had to best club there and some of the nices people who are willing to chat and teach and who are humble. There were great to be with.

    than ebcasueo f work, I had to move to Northern Washington. I waited and waited until the next months bee meeting and I was so happy to go... jsut to find out how arrogent (sp?) a lot of the members were. I do not want to be around that at all. I was telling someone about some mite treatment that is hapepening amongest some other beekeepers and he just looked at me and brushed me off.

    I am 25 years old and one of the youngest beekeeprs in WA. I can not tell you how man people who are odler have brushed me off because I am young. I am used to it. I am an executive chef and get it all the time from other employees who have a hard time listening to a younger boss.

    My point is that the beekeepers who are approachable for advice, teaching, counciling, ect are hard to come by. I cantn ot beleieve that attitude change from the beekeepers who I have met in Eugene and the beekeepers who I have met in this part of Washington.

    My wife and I have a "policy". When someone calls or wants to drop by and talk about bees or are interested in learning, we spend time with each and every one of them.

    There is once a quote that I loved but cant recall who said it. They said that "you do not come into the worl knowing anything so why try to leave the world keeping secrets. Share your knowledge as it will live forever.

    Sorry for the rant.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Borden, In
    Posts
    98

    Post

    Well I'm 57 years old, and just started beekeeping this year. My Grandfather has 40 hives in the 60 before he died. I still remember a lot I learned from him, I suprised myself. I get a lot of information from a young man of 28 who has been beekeeping for about 8 years. I taught him how to make wine now he is returning the favor. I don't have a problem learning from someone younger than my self

    The older I get the more things I want to experience, but I have to many hobbys and to few years left, but I jumped in anyway.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Post

    LMN:

    You are in a rare class. When I took my first executive chef job at a country club at age 23, there was a guy who was older than me and would neevr respect me. I hated it.

    I am glad people can learn from younger people.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Alpharetta, GA, USA
    Posts
    520

    Post

    Sundance and Hawk- have you read the book- Following the Bloom about the Pollination trade?

    I'm 39 and am into my 3rd yr beekeeping. My 8 yr old son is "interested" but too afraid of being stung now since he (and his sister) were both stung once last year by bees from a hot hive I used to have. I requeened the hive and now their gentle but my son is still wary.
    I plan to talk to his Cub Scout Den sometime about the bees and also his 3rd grade class. If only one kid took up bees later in life, those efforts would all be worth it. I'm smitten with the critters.
    Ken

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brown County, IN
    Posts
    2,034

    Post

    I'm 45 and started beekeeping this year - 1 hive. I bought an extra hat & veil at a yard sale and my kids take turns helping me when I do inspections. Don't know if they are "future beekeepers" yet, but they enjoy being out there with me.

    My kids were the only ones in the county who did beekeeping 4-H projects - just a poster for the first year - so they won by default and went to the State Fair. Even though I'm a newbee myself, I think our county 4-H director is going to recruit me as the 4-H beekeeping advisor.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    > I'm 45 and started beekeeping this year

    Then you ARE the "next generation". [img]smile.gif[/img]

    The demographics on beekeepers are clear
    and compelling. The bulk of beekeepers
    take it up as a hobby in their 40s through 60s,
    and the typical beekeeper keeps bees for an
    average of 5 years before wandering off and
    taking up a different hobby. (Down from an
    average of 7 years not so long ago.)

    There are exceptions of course, but the
    overwhelming bulk of beekeepers follow a
    very predictable sequence.

    There is a currently small, but interesting
    demographic developing - gardeners who feel
    that a hive of bees (or two) are required
    to pollinate their gardens. These folks may
    not be interested in honey, so they have a
    very different set of priorities in regard
    to their bees. The only coherent explanation
    of their point of view can be found in Kim
    Flottum's new book:
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...books&n=507846

    There are ongoing efforts to interest pre-teens
    and teenagers in beekeeping, but these efforts
    are mostly doomed to failure, as bees have a
    hard time competing with cars, dating, and
    sports. Out of a high school of 1000+ students,
    my ragtag team of part-time beekeepers stays
    at a constant level of about 6, and in a period
    of over a decade, only two have ever asked to
    take a few hives home, even though all are
    offered splits, drawn comb, and free woodenware
    to start their own apiaries.

    We are starting to see more women taking beginner
    classes and showing up at workshops, most of this
    can be attributed to "home schooling" in homes
    with patents that are weak in science-related
    areas, and decide to go heavy on "natural history".

    There are lots of kids who might enjoy keeping
    bees, but the effort and resources expended on
    the fantasy of "educating the next generation"
    should be redirected with the knowledge that
    beekeepers tend to be adults more often than
    children.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Post

    I am in the mid sixties and can say that the most impressing thing that interests youth in bees is my observation hive. The startling amazement showing on their faces and comments like "cool" and "wow" are forthcoming then comes the questions. The observation hive is in my living room and even kids that are fearful of bees soon get their nose up to the glass in amazement to watch my "bee tv". Wish that I had built one years ago. My wife, our children and grandchildren help with all aspects of explaining the observation hive and harvesting the honey crop, my youngest grandson will only eat "Pappy's" honey, not the store bought stuff. This is truly the most rewarding and memorable hobby to be a part of. I hope some of my family members keep this bee keeping tradition going when I am no longer involved with it.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Ken says......"Sundance and Hawk- have you read the book- Following the Bloom about the Pollination trade?"

    Funny you should mention that book..... I bought a hardcover copy off ebay 2 days ago and anxiously await its arrival.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    cool quote Chef...I'm gonna have to remember it.

    BubbaBob

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    At 47 the last of my 5 children, my youngest son, has his feet set on this course. At 14 it could still change but I don't see it at this time. I was able to reach back a generation and get my dad involved too. It has been a great experiance. I see a similar set of facts in agriculture as Sundance mentions. Either you are a huge coporate dairy, winery, bee, operation (in our area) or a small, very focused farm. Our family farms are gone here in a community that 50 yrs ago were mostly farmers. Those that have survived have found a way to retail their high quality product at a higher rate and also sell the "Farm" with tours, bed & breakfast type operations and the such. We have had to work hard to maintain in a market 250 miles from home that requires 8-10 hrs on the road every Saturday + 6 or 7 hrs at the market. It's very difficult for me to fathom the future of others in beekeeping as I spend a great deal of effort trying to build a sustainable future for my operation. The future of beekeeping I think is not face much different forces than other farming.

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