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Thread: got stung

  1. #41
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    "In the United States alone, anaphylaxis accounts for approximately 500 deaths each year and significant morbidity. Hymenoptera envenomation is a major contributor to these statistics."

    http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic1058.htm

    That's 500 from ANY cause of anaphylaxis. SOME of those were from stings (Hymenoptera includes wasps, hornets, bees etc.) and SOME of those stings were bees (Apis) and SOME of those bees were honey bees (Apis Mellifera).

    More than 40,000 people die every year from auto accidents.

    The statistics are that you're much more likely to die in a wreck on the way to your beeyard than from bee stings.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  2. #42
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    driving, the number one most dangerous thing we do. Rise gas price rise!

  3. #43
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    "The rest of the story"
    Death from Bee stings has been greatly reduced because of the use of epinephrine. I wonder the number of cases of anaphylaxis treated in ER's and the person saved.

    Also I believe those 500 died because in most cases epinephrine was not available.

    Remote areas like Dan & I.

    Anaphylaxis is common in commercial beekeeper circles. The last death was a couple years ago in a Florida beekeepers workforce. I know because I helped the beekeeper find insurance after his commercial insurance was cancelled. The beekeeper went down in a remote area without benefit of an epipen.

    Children of commercial beekeepers have had anaphylaxis with only a sting. The reason has been traced to washing sting bee suits in the same washing machine as the family.

    Those beekeepers without a full immunity can (and do) get serious reactions after years of keeping bees. I never heard of a beekeeper that gets as many stings as I do a year having a serious reaction.

    Michael said:
    "statistics are that you're much more likely to die in a wreck on the way to your beeyard than from bee stings"

    I am still taking my EpiPen along!

    Bob says:
    "statistics are that you're more likely to die of anaphylaxis than on a commercial airliner" (excluding 911)
    Bob Harrison

  4. #44
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    I have no doubt that it is rare, BUT it does happen. A fire burning down your home is also unlikely but it doesn't mean we shouldn't keep a fire extingisher around just in case.

    I talked to a man the other day that was a beekeeper at one time. His son was stung and they almost lost him due to the allergic reaction. Fortunately, he was close to a hospital. The trauma for them was such that he quit bees.

    I figure if the cost is only $27 every 3 years or so what does it hurt. I'd rather spend the $9 a year and never use it than to need it and not have it. For the cost..... why not?

    Dan
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  5. #45
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    I just got a prescription with refills for Epipen from the Doc, did on annual checkup. I do not seem to have a problems with allergies as I can pull poison oak and ivy with out a reaction, and do not even feel or see a reaction to bee stings (except on the ends of my fingers and it hurts like hell).
    But, as the sole provider for my family I feel it is my obligation to not take chances with my life.

    So like Rob ,I carry it with me when working the bees, not in the truck or anywhere else it takes you 20 mins. to reach.

    This is just my pref. Which I believe is smart for me as I avoid wearing any beesuit, gloves, etc.

    Murphy
    \"I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree<br />And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made<br />nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee<br />and live alone in the bee-loud glade.\"<br />-- WB Yeats

  6. #46
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    EpiPen's website is pretty informative

    http://www.epipen.com/causes_insects.aspx

    Dave

  7. #47
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    Murphy:
    I agree with you if you work bees alone you should have it, and probably a cell phone as well, you never know when the ticker might give you trouble, or other types of injuries the phone might be a lifesaver. Or when someone else will need it.
    An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, after all it is venom, and I have heard of beekeepers that after many years of beekeeping have had a adverse reaction
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  8. #48
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    Brent,
    Cell phones are a big help. problem is many times they don't work in remote areas. Hopefully things will improve. Years ago I bought out a beekeeper named Bruce Sunderland from Raytown, Missouri. Actually from his widow. Seems Bruce did not return home from his bee yard. His wife went looking and found Bruce dead laying against the front wheel of his truck in his full bee suit. Perhaps a cell phone would have got him help? A heart attack was what she said killed Bruce.

    Can you hear me now? Can you hear me now?

    My cell phone only works part of the time on my farm. I have tried all the services available.
    Bob Harrison

  9. #49
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    Jul 2005
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    Grinton, North Yorkshire, England
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    The lady who lives down the road from me, who I bought my hives from, had to give up because she became allergic over time. I think she kept bees for about 10 years with no problem at all, but now she can't even go near them. She was quite relieved when I took them out of her yard, where they had been sitting untouched for about five or six years, and put them on the other side of the village in my back garden. Cell phones don't work where I live either, so I haven't bothered buying one!

  10. #50
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    Rob,
    Where do you get an epipen for $27.

    Thanks,

    Dick Marron

  11. #51
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    Mar 2005
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    Osco about three years ago was the last I bought. I have bought several over the years. If my wife picked up the EpiPen (I think she did ) not sure of the price.
    The last time i picked up the prescription the price I remember was $27.
    What are todays cost list?
    Bob Harrison

  12. #52
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    Aug 2005
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    Central San Joaquin Valley, California
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    Very glad to read all the bee sting comments. I was just going to ask about it. I received my fourth (since starting a hive in May) sting yesterday. The swelling continues down and around my arm from the impact point (inside arm inner bicep). Puffiness is almost to my wrist and mostly surrounds my arm at the bicep area. The itching continues constantly as the previous three bites have done. I now expect it to last about four days. I have applied cortisone cream and benydril (I think) cream with a slight reduction in the itch. With the extreme possibility of being stung at least once within any four day period should I stick it out with my bee expansion plans, I shudder to think about itching for the rest of my life.
    My doctor couldn't give me much hope, but out there somewhere, I pray, is a medication that will stop the itch. The sting is nothing - I wasn't even sure I was being stung until I looked - but the itching (and, somewhat, the swelling are driving me mad. Do any of you know of what I might be looking for? Or can offer any info regarding the possibility of building up a reduction of sting symptoms? I've got three more days on this one. Fast answers will help.
    Thanks,
    Laurence Hope
    His Hive Honey Farm - Do all for His glory!

  13. #53
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    Dr. Hope, try Ice packs.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  14. #54
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    Jun 2005
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    The itching drives me crazy too as well as the swelling. My allergist, when I was asking about the venom therapy, said that was normal and that some folks will have more itching than others. Something about how your body gets rid of the venom and how much there is (my wife had to repeat this numerous times for me, dang meds!)in the local area. I take about three to four days and the local swelling completely disappears after about a week. The last one leaked that evening and for the next three days. I posted earlier about using a hot rag for the pain and for me it worked. I didn't tell the Doc about the persistent swelling and leaking yet. He told me to keep him appraised (-1 sp). Benadryl has also been ineffective. If you find anything please post it. If I find anything new I'll post and PM you Laurence. Take care! David

  15. #55
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    Your MD may have been reluctant to prescribe it due to side effects, but I'm pretty sure that 1 small dose of a prednisone would clear that up. Try an over the counter cortisone cream (2% if you can find it). If there is any chance that you could be pregnant, this is a bad idea.

  16. #56
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    Different people definately react differently. I rarely swell except in certain areas but I don't ever remember itching from a sting. Strange how the human body works. One sting to another one person to another.

    Dan
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  17. #57
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    Obviously y'all are into medications. [img]smile.gif[/img] I've never taken anything for a sting except to put a poultice on the site.

    My first sting of the season I sometimes get that much swelling. After that I seldom get any. Every sting will not be the same as the one before. Most get less intense. The best time to treat a sting is immeadiately. Immediately remove the stinger. Immediately put crushed plantain leaf on it. For me that usually means it stops hurting immediately and I can't find the sting an hour later.

    http://weeds.cropsci.uiuc.edu/images...20plantain.jpg

    I would not assume your next sting will be like the last. It seldom if ever is.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  18. #58
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    Jan 2004
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    When you said "plantain" I thought you meant banana. Thanks for including the link to the picture. I have plenty of this in my yard.

  19. #59
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    If you have a family member or friend who's a physician, they can set you up with a couple vials of adrenaline and a couple syringes. Keep them in foil (light degrades the adrenaline) in your fridge with clear directions for whomever has to use it. If you're cool-headed when you can't breathe, a legitimate consideration, you can just draw up .15 to .3 mls and inject sub-Q. You'll save a bundle on the peace of mind that Epi-Pen charges a premium for. The benefit of the EpiPen is that it's a no-brainer, but I fortunately inherited much of my father's machine-like nerves at crisis time [img]smile.gif[/img] .

    That brings up a thought... the nasal preparations of oxymetolazine hydrochloride .05% (Afrin et. al.) are basically adrenaline; I've used them to stop trauma nosebleeds and other persistent bleeding on the recommendation of said medic. (Ah, the secret delights of working in mental health ) Anyone know how much adrenaline you'd get into your blood from snarfing up a bunch of nasal spray?
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  20. #60
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    Central San Joaquin Valley, California
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    Thank you all for your answers and input.
    I always look for the natural way to treat everything, and hate chemical meds and only use them if nothing else is available. I will look to see if there is a product made from the essence of plantain. I never heard of it before and the picture doesn't look familiar.
    Laurence Hope
    His Hive Honey Farm - Do all for His glory!

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