Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 72

Thread: got stung

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Metairie, Louisiana
    Posts
    226

    Post

    got stung yesterday evening around 6:30 or so,& my wife noticed the area was still warm as did I until we went to sleep. This am the area is still warm to the touch & is pinkish. The area is the inside of my forearm, there never was any swelling. Is this normal from a honeybee sting or is it a slight allergic reaction?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    JP,

    Unfortunately every sting is an "allergic reaction" to one degree or another. The ones that we worry the most about are stings that cause a systemic response (anaphlaxis, difficulty breathing) or local tissue destruction. It is always a good idea to have an epipen around and you should be concerned if your response to bee stings gets progressively worse. Taking an antihistamine before working the bees may help. Bee suits also work. Many people on this web site can recommend good ones.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,069

    Post

    I'm certainly no doctor but I'd say it is pretty normal.

    Different stings seem to affect me in different ways. Sometimes I get stung and have barely any reaction. I got stung 2x last weekend once on the back and once on the bicep both thru the suit. The one on my back just caused a little welt for an hour or so. The one on my bicep swelled my upper arm up for about 6 hours and made my whole arm hurt to move. The red area spread to my whole upper arm. I put a hot pack on it that evening and the swelling and pain went away within 30min.

    I don't know why it works that way but different stings seem to have different effects.

    Dan
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Morganton, NC
    Posts
    83

    Post

    I've been stung off and on each year. So far, 3 times this year, and still only once while actually working with my bees. The others were accidents or yellow jackets, etc. Normally I just have localized swelling to certain degrees, sometimes worse, sometimes less swelling.
    But last Friday, I was doing a little work in my beeyard with full suit and one of my girls managed to get up inside my rubber boots. This time I ended up in the emergency room with my lips 3 times the normal size, hives all over my body and the scariest part my tounge and throat swollen till I could barely breathe. All in minutes!
    Well, 4 hours later and three shots, I came home from the ER with an Epipen and 2 prescriptions. Not counting the $100 copay at the ER and whatever other bills coming. Wonder why, now such a systemic reaction from a sting on the foot? Scary, just now fully getting over it. Still have blisters on my tongue and in my throat.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pikeville, Kentucky
    Posts
    12

    Post

    If I get stung on the hands or arms I just have a small whelt and pain for 2 or 3 hours. If I get stung on my fingers it don't hurt as long but for days after they are sore to touch. I got stung on my leg (yes I should have tucked my pantlegs in) and it left a place like a large red bruise. it seems that every sting is different.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    St. Clair, Mo.
    Posts
    133

    Post

    I was stung twice yesterday while doing some manipulations. I was wearing a jacket and jeans like usual. Well, the girls must not have liked what I was doing, because I got stung once through my jeans on my inner thigh, and another crawled up my leg and got my ankle. The thigh doesn't hurt at all, but my ankle is stiff and sure hurts today! Usually, the only ones that really bother me are on the face/neck or hands. Then I get alot of swelling. However, I have never had a systemic reaction or symptoms anywhere but the affected area. I guess there's just too many variables to be able to predict what a single sting will do.
    \"Home is where the hive is.\"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    White County, Arkansas
    Posts
    874

    Post

    The last time I was stung (my fault) I immediately applied a HOT washcloth and didn't have the pain like the last two. The 'drive you nuts' itching wasn't affected but the pain went away quicker.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    307

    Post

    The next time I'm working the bees in the bathroom where a hot washcloth is handy, I'll remember that. I know that there are several things that people say you can do to alleviate the pain from a sting if you do them immediately, but I'm always in the middle of something when I get nailed and never willing to stop what I'm doing and tend to the sting.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    >This am the area is still warm to the touch & is pinkish. The area is the inside of my forearm, there never was any swelling. Is this normal from a honeybee sting or is it a slight allergic reaction?

    It is well in the range of what, and at the bottom end of, what is normal. It does not sound at all allergic, but I would not consider it to be even if it swelled up a lot for several days. There's a reason they call it "venom".
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Georgia, VT
    Posts
    67

    Post

    Aspera, how would I be able to tell if there is tissue destruction going on? Right now my right hand, wrist, and part of my forarm is very swollen and hot. Hand is almost 2X the size of the left hand. Cann't make a fist or close hand completely, all this from one sting. Recieved 2 on left leg that do not bother me at all. Girls were crawling up inside my pant leg. The only stings that cause my much trouble are those that I get on the back of my hand and each time I get stung on the hand the reaction appears worse. Not sure if I should get my hand checked out or not!
    Randy
    Randy<br /><br />\'Cause I not be nobody else!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
    Posts
    629

    Post

    Swelling is considered normal.

    Hives and itching under arms and trouble breathing are not.

    I actually never heard of tissue damage before the above post. I have heard of plenty of tissue damage with certain spider & snake bites. Bee venom is similar to snake venom so could be a possibility.

    Many are not allergic to the venom but the bee protein also injected.

    Very little is done at emergency wards *unless* you are in anaphylaxis except take your money. I would always ask for an epipen prescription as I always keep one on hand (3 year shelf life but would not be afraid to use if all that is available). I always keep animal epinephrine around and a syringe. you can buy the animal without a prescription.

    Tales from the farm and not for the timid!

    I have saved a human life with the animal epinephrine (worker for the K.C. zoo) and an animal with the epipen (went into anaphylaxis after a CD & T injection I gave her).

    The animal (6 weeks old) had ran wide open into two gates (could not breath). I caught the animal and threw her on the ground and held her down with my knee while I gave her the epipen. Ok within a minute.

    The zoo worker went down in my bee yard and all that was available was a syring and animal epinephrine. He was unable to breathe and was nodding to use the syringe so we gave him 2 cc in the hip. Within seconds he was breathing normal again.

    I have watched a horse die from anaphylaxis. By the time the vet had hit the horse with a tranc gun and we got to his side he was gone. Animals run till they die from terror.

    Similar to drowning I have been told by doctors.

    We tried to run a piece of hose down his throat to give him CPR but too late.

    My 90 year old beekeeping mentor did a trac on a fellow beekeeper with a pocket knife and a soda pop straw. The beekeeper remained calm and lived. He showed me the method but have never had to use the method but would if I thought the beekeeper could keep his witts about him as the procedure is simple but leaves a scar and needs stiches later at the doctors office. Very little bleeding involved.

    I live in a remote area. help is at least a half hour away.
    Bob Harrison

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    &lt;My 90 year old beekeeping mentor did a trac on a fellow beekeeper with a pocket knife and a soda pop straw.&gt;

    Just in case this sounds good to someone, we no longer do tracheotomies. Now it's a Chricothyroidotomy. Through the chricothyroid (ask your Doctor to show you, it's the Anterolateral aspect of cricoid cartilage).

    The other will get you sued.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    Bob, times change...you can no longer epinephrine over the counter, even for vet type use...it is now scrip only unless you know a vet.

    BubbaBob

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    “Bee venom is hemorrhagic, differing from snake (viper) venom, which is a coagulant.”

    http://www.internethealthlibrary.com...om-therapy.htm

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    In cases of extreme allergic reactions, tissue can loose its blood supply, causing it to die and slough away (think frost bite). This is not an immediate reaction, but rather delayed and often associated with secondary bacterial infections. Some snake venom toxins, (and bee venom to a lesser extent) contains collaginases that help to break down tisssues, allowing other toxic factors to penetrate more easily. Sammatro's introductory beekeeping book lists the exact constitiuents of bee venom.
    Imebee, what you describe sounds like the classic signs of inflammation (redness, heat, swelling, pain). If it is not improving rapidly (24-48 hours), then definitely get it checked out.
    Don't attempt a tracheotomy. If you are that worried 1) get an epipen/dexamethasone and 2) get an endotracheal tube and instruction on how to use it. Animal/human epinephrine are usually the same stuff. The advantage of an epipen is that the dose will be appropriate for most people without a heart condition. Anaplaxis resulting from a single bee sting would be exceptionally rare, and as Bob mentioned, is characterized by the rapid appearence of hives and itching. It's my opinion that most peanut butter sandwiches are more likely to do this than your honeybees.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
    Posts
    629

    Post

    Hawk,
    Your a dead man if you are around me and have a reaction! You might change your mind right before things start turning dark or perhaps when you start turning blue! I guess I could place a knee on your chest till your life was gone as you refused treatment and would not want you to hurt yourself running into gates!

    I am not recommending the procedure but rather carry the EpiPen but as a last form of saving a life would want the procedure tried on myself. My partner was a KC area policeman for 17 years and said the trac was shown to him as shown to me years ago and fairly simple to perform if one has a sharp knife and a steady hand. My partner has both!

    The old beekeepers which performed the successful trac over fifty years ago new exactly what they were doing and death was going to happen without action. Breathing through the straw was hard my mentor said (like using a reed to breathe under water). Calmness was needed.


    BubbaBob,
    Easy to get through the mail from vet supply houses. Email direct if you want the supply house contact information.

    Dick Allen,
    For over forty years of beekeeping I have heard time and again that the actual bee venom is *similar* to cobra venom only in a very very small dose.

    Agreed bee venom is hemorrhagic and viper venom is a coagulant (but only part of the story). I have sit through many talks on the subject. Not the same for sure but *similar* in many ways according to the experts I have heard speak.

    Dictionary:
    Similar:
    " Bearing resemblance to something else;but not completely alike"

    I am not one to stand around in an emergency. Anaphylaxis is serious business when you are thirty minutes from help. i am trained in CPR and even baby CPR. Hate to lose a loved one because my life was too busy to get trained. When you live next door to a fire station or a hospital might not be as valuable but invaluable in remote areas.
    Bob Harrison

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    Bob, calm down! I simply listed a web site pointing out the differences between the two. No reason to get all upset, is there?

    Here, maybe this will help you.

    “Cobra snake venom cardiotoxins and bee venom melittin share a number of pharmacological properties in intact tissues including hemolysis, cytolysis, contractures of muscle, membrane depolarization and activation of tissue phospholipase C and, to a far lesser extent, an arachidonic acid-associated phospholipase A2. The toxins have also been demonstrated to open the Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor) and alter the activity of the Ca(2+)+Mg(2+)-ATPase in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum preparations derived from cardiac or skeletal muscle.”

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...&dopt=Abstract

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
    Posts
    629

    Post

    I am not upset! I love these discussions! I have been in some very heated discussions at meetings!
    Bob Harrison

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    bee venom is a complex mixture. excerpt taken from a review by PR deLima:

    Hymenoptera venoms are complex mixtures containing simple organic molecules, proteins, peptides, and other bioactive elements. Several of these components have been isolated and characterized, and their primary structures determined by biochemical techniques. These compounds are responsible for many toxic or allergic reactions in different organisms, such as local pain, inflammation, itching, irritation, and moderate or severe allergic reactions. The most extensively characterized Hymenoptera venoms are bee venoms, mainly from the Apis genus and also from social wasps and ant species. However, there is little information about other Hymenoptera groups. The Apis venom presents high molecular weight molecules - enzymes with a molecular weight higher than 10.0 kDa - and peptides. The best studied enzymes are phospholipase A2, responsible for cleaving the membrane phospholipids, hyaluronidase, which degrades the matrix component hyaluronic acid into non-viscous segments and acid phosphatase acting on organic phosphates. The main peptide compounds of bee venom are lytic peptide melittin, apamin (neurotoxic), and mastocyte degranulating peptide (MCD)

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    White County, Arkansas
    Posts
    874

    Post

    Sorry. My immediately was actually about 20 minutes later when I was done. As usual it still hurt like the dickens. For me it hurts about 3 hours regardless where I'm stung (hand, foot or neck).

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads