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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Calvert County, MD
    Posts
    18

    Question

    near my bees. I would move the brush pile but it's so big it would take days. I am going to move the hives around the corner instead.
    I was wondering if anyone else burned things around their bees and what safe distance was used.
    Is it okay to move a hive temporarily?
    Will my bees get lost?
    Should I block the entrance till the burn pile is finished or just let them find their home instead.
    TIA!

  2. #2
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    I wish I could see how big the pile is and how far away it is from the hive. As a rule you can ask yourself "would I be safe if I was standing there when the pile is burning?", if not I would say the hive wouldn't be safe. You can move a hive strait back 15 to 20 feet with little effect on the bees.

    You can block the heat by placing a peace of plywood (or something that will block the heat) between the hive and the burn pile, just make sure the plywood doesn't get too hot. Keep the plywood close to the hive but not touching, and spray it down with the water hose to keep it from getting too hot.

    If you think it will only take a few hours to burn the pile, you can block the entrance early one morning, move them to a safe distance, burn the pile, then put them back to open them up. By the time the pile is burned and you have the bees back it may be warm enough for them to fly.

    BB

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    South Mississippi
    Posts
    128

    Post

    A brush pile about 100 feet from 3 of my hives got into the grass and burned all around the hives late this afternoon. The bees are still there but wont know how much damaged was done until tomorrow when I take a peek. Keeping my fingers crossed that they weren't hurt to bad.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    My burn pile is about 20 feet to the back of my hives. It has been so big that the flames reach 15 feet up but it is never over 7'X12' area. This burn pile was there long before the hives and the area around it is clean. I did have the leaves in the fall burn up near my hives(within 6 feet) but this fire was not hot enough to do any damage. Remember heat rises and if you can stand there and not break a sweat the bees will do fine. Some radient heat is produced so light colored hives and clothes help.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Butte Co - North State California
    Posts
    19

    Smile

    Well good luck. Out here they have become very restrictive on burning. Permit, only a few days in certain months, and the fire must be cold out by noon, and the fire chief lives less than a block away on the other street. Soooooo, I bought a utility trailer from The Deep-O. Best money I ever spent. I got a load to go out Tewsday.
    --Ðøug 2004.3.29.1.35.56 PT

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Maple Plain Minnesota
    Posts
    182

    Post

    Remember that when the pile is mostly burnt down and many coals remain is when it is the hotest. If you use water to keep things cool don't quit too soon. Watch the wind direction. If blowing heat away from the bees the fire can be quit close.
    If you can not reach the fire with a water hose , DON'T BURN.

    ------------------
    Erwin

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,369

    Big Grin

    <<Out here they have become very restrictive on burning.>>

    Funny, I didn't think there was anything left to burn in CA! Two towns over from me, there's two vacant lots. One was a house, the other an apartment/tavern. They're about 200 yards apart, with the fire dept. smack in the middle.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Mineral, Virginia
    Posts
    188

    Post

    I recently burnt a pile of actual logs, stumps and brush about 8 feet high, 6 feet wide and 100 feet long, about 30 feet from my hives. Didn't bother them in the least; it was a warm spring day, they continued business as usual.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Last weekend we burnt off the CRP field that I keep one of my yards in. An important factor is to catch the wind in the right direction, and back-burning.

    This is an interesting time in the Flint Hills of Kansas. Everyone should see a prarie fire at least onec in their lives, awsome. The interstates, 35 & 135, will get shut down at times from the smoke, and the flames will reach as high as fifty feet while moving at incredible speeds.

    They call these controlled fires. Yeah, right, set it and hope it stops where you want it to.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
    Posts
    456

    Post

    Rent a chipper, you'll end up with a nice big pile of mulch. We use it in the beds around the house and to cover over muddy spots around the barn.

    City friends drive out and load up their SUVs and figure they are saving loads of money.

    And the chickens spend hours scratching bugs out of the pile.

    all good.

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