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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Bend, OR USA
    Posts
    93

    Post

    I just captured and hived a swarm for the first time last night. Interesting experience and a lot of fun. I was wondering if it is a good idea to requeen a swarm soon after hiving it.

    Thanks,
    Roger

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Post

    Unless they turn "hot" I never do. They will replace her if they need to. Sometimes it's an afterswarm with a new queen anyway.

  3. #3

    Post

    I'm inclinded to agree with MB, I'd wait it out and see what kind of shape she's in. You might just get a very good queen out of the deal.
    --
    MB: (Just FYI)
    At our bee club meeting this past month, one of the "leaders" (club officer & long time beekeeper) made the recommendation to IMMEDIATELY requeen any captured swarms. Such is the the concern (fear?) of problems with AHBs now.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Post

    I sure hate to see all those successful genes eliminated from the pool.

    I do understand that AHB are scary. But we are, after all, beekeepers aren't we? I certainly don't LIKE having AHB, but if that's what they turn out to be, I deal with it.

    Of course, some people don't even own a veil let alone a beesuit.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Bend, OR USA
    Posts
    93

    Post

    If potential AHBs (Africanized?) are the only reason to requeen a swarm, I'm not going to bother. I doubt if Africanized bees can survive our winters. I guess the next question is should I requeen the swarm this fall? I was planning on requeening all of my hives each fall, but maybe I want to hang on to the genes from this queen.

    Thanks,
    Roger

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Post

    If you want to keep the genes and you want to requeen, why not put the queen, a frame of brood and a frame of honey in a nuc and let them raise one this fall. If it fails you have a spare queen around, if it succeeds you requeened. Or take a frame of emerging brood, a frame of open brood and a couple of frames of honey/pollen and make a nuc and let the nuc raise a queen and then remove the old queen and combine back.

    Persoanlly, I figure the bees will probably replace her if she's failing and otherwise she'll probably do ok.

  7. #7

    Lightbulb

    Rogerio,
    Yeah, the lack of AHBs in your area is why I said I'd also be inclined to keep her (in agreement with MB's advice). If the thrust of your question about requeening in the Fall is out of concern for her {unknown} age, then MB has offered you a good alternative. However, if she's still laying a good brood pattern (not necessarily the "amount" of brood since she will naturally cut back in the Fall) but if the "pattern" is still good and not spotty, then I'd let her over winter as well and check on her next Spring.

    --
    MB -
    I think the main reason for the swarm requeening "immediate" recommendation is that the DFW 'Metroplex' has turned into such an overall URBAN area, the fear of a bad stinging incident (such as the article posted about the guy south of us, in Palestine, TX) scares the long time beekeepers from the stand point of bringing down the law (possibly, many more "restrictions") on us beekeepers. We tend to have fairly new and novice beekeepers "volunteering" for swarm collection each year (they only see the aspect of "free" bees!), and he was personally concerned those newly collected swarms may not be handled appropriately in backyard situations by the fairly new and inexperienced beekeepers (which is probably a valid concern).
    I, personally, have mixed feelings about the recommendation to immediately requeen. On the one hand, it certainly follows the "better safe than sorry" rule (especially if you get sued over someone's pet dog getting stung to death...or worse). But I, too, hate to see the loss of such a rich pool of potentially Varroa resistance genetics being lost. I've still got a little space around me (4 or 5 acres), so I tend to wait until I can see how defensive they turn out to be. However, since I've got entire subdivisions (300 and 400 homes) going in on the east and west side of me, I don't wait too long (thus, my past postings on how to quickly kill a hive - fortunately, I haven't had to do that often).

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Of course, some people don't even own a veil let alone a beesuit.


    Greetings MB (knowing you're not speaking tome anymore....LOL)

    Yup! I misplaced my veil and haven't owned a suit. Just put lavender on my arms and take to the fir tree if neccessary.

    But I find that if I just wet the t-shirt cloth and drape them over the open hives, they don't get too riled up.

    Jes have ta think like a bee..

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Post

    Me, not speaking to you? Daisy, you're one of my favorite people!

    I have a manipulation cloth, but I do seldom use it. Brushy Mt. sells them.

    Let's hope none of your hives go viscious on you. It can be a real eye opener.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Bend, OR USA
    Posts
    93

    Post

    It looks like most of that swarm absconded. There's still a few around but nothing like the amount I shook into the hive. I shook them into a double deep (it was a big swarm, 6-8 lbs) and I didn't use any Lemon Pledge as a nasonol substitute. What did I do wrong?


    Roger

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Post

    Maybe you didn't do anything wrong. Sometimes they just leave. You can try putting a queen excluder on the bottom to keep them in, but if it's an afterswarm with a virgin, she can't get out to mate.

    If you keep an eye on them and if they start clustering outside or nearby, and you keep putting them back in again. They usually eventually give up and stay.

    Usually, of course, they are just happy to find such a nice home and don't try to leave. but you never know.

  12. #12

    Exclamation

    The most effective way to lock a swarm in place is to give them a frame of open brood. This will hold them there long enough for them to decide to stay put; they will almost NEVER leave when brood needs to be tended and brood cells need capping.

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