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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Cool

    I just got my website up enough to post some pictures:
    http://www.workingbees.cjb.net/HistoricStagsville.html

    Sorry the pictures are not cropped or annotated. This was the 1st for this year - hopefully I'll get more. I think I got the queen. The bees seem to be doing well in their new digs - hauling in pollen and cleaning out their old honey combs. The 1st 3 24-hour mite drop counts were 3, 5, 3. No wax moths or SHB seen. I'll measure cell sizes after the bees have moved up into a new hive box. I'll probably get some small-cell foundation for them to draw.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    Great pictures.

    Jim Fischer:

    As far as combs ALWAYS being horizontal here's a recent removal and the comb on the left is running exactly vertically.
    http://www.workingbees.cjb.net/Stags...s/144_4482.JPG

    and another picture of it:
    http://www.workingbees.cjb.net/Stags...s/145_4531.JPG

    and another:
    http://www.workingbees.cjb.net/Stags...s/145_4534.JPG

    This com on the other side is also not horizontal:
    http://www.workingbees.cjb.net/Stags...s/145_4552.JPG

    and antoher picture of this one:
    http://www.workingbees.cjb.net/Stags...s/145_4570.JPG

    All of these look vertical to me.

    But maybe the building used to be laying on it's side...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Brandon, MS. US
    Posts
    14

    Post

    Neat! I like your brood frames. Looks like you used nails and nylon string to hold the brood into frames.
    And, as always Michael, you educate me. I did not know bees would build comb like that.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >As far as combs ALWAYS being horizontal here's a recent removal and the comb on the left is running exactly vertically.


    It's compleatly obvious to me as I have seen many times brood combs, (brood pattern), running in all directions. They don't very well run horizonal in a tree, those are always verticle unless it's laying over.

    Could the subject have been cells being verticle, meaning point up or horizonal meaning flat side running horizonal?

    An interesting observation in my OB hive. The queen has made two distinct brood areas seperated by six inches of empty comb. The bottom comb is fully lain on the left half,(thr right half being hatched out) and the next one up is started on the right side.

    I was watching her trying to work the right side of the lower frame and the bees would not let her cross them to get to it. That side has already hatched out and is now empty.

    For some reason, she is laying on both ends of the second frame with absolutly nothing in the center eight inches of frame.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Cool

    Caddy,
    I actually used nails (bent slightly upward to hook the comb) and cotton string. The theory is that the bees will remove the cotton string, but in practice (so far) they just propolize it. It's easy (and fast) to hook the comb on nails and then cris-cross string (using a stapler to attach to frame) to hold it in place. I built one of the "swarm capture" frames, but it took too long and imo doesn't do a better job.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >The theory is that the bees will remove the cotton string, but in practice (so far) they just propolize it.

    They WILL remove rubber bands. I use the nails too (in a cross slat of wood), but find rubber bands makes less work and quicker once you learn to use the hook on your tool to manipulate the bands.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Boynton Beach, Florida, USA
    Posts
    278

    Post

    Hi DB

    Thanks for sharing the experience. I always enjoy see these kinds of pictures as feral bees are almost non-existent here.

    Regards
    topbarguy

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Benson North Carolina
    Posts
    27

    Post

    DB-Great shots,
    I Love staggville, I grew up not far from there and played with others before the area around the slave quarters were cleaned up and made a landmark.
    My Great uncle kept bees {about 600 hives} and I remember that there were a bunch there about 40 years ago. I remember seeing them coming out from the eves of one of the slave quarters. I tried to get him to go get them and he would just say that he had enough to tend to as it was.
    Good luck with them.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Cool

    THANKS to all for the feedback.

    Hey BB - I'll bet the bees are real surprised when the rubber band snaps!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >Hey BB - I'll bet the bees are real surprised when the rubber band snaps!

    For some reason that reminds me of what the last theing is that goes through a bugs mind when it gets hit by an automobile at sixty miles per hour.

    The windshield.

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