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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Post

    "But, seriously, do you really think the crops we raise in this country wouldn't be successful if no honey bees lived here? You really think yields of wheat and rice and corn and all other crops would be so low that we couldn't even sustain our own population?"

    I don't know for sure about the grasses, but in the case of legumes, and based on my over abundance of tomatoes last year, I would say that there would be a serious food shortage in just this country, without honeybees.

    "I'm surprised to read that you found honey bees to be far more successful at pollinating tomatoes than bumble bees are. That contradicts everything I've read comparing the two in scientific journals."

    I have no doubt that you are correct in saying that it was sheer numbers that caused my exceptional crop of tomatoes. Bumble bees are very efficient pollinators as compared to honeybees, but there just isn't a large population of them left, and therefore their contibution to the overall pollination of plants is limited.

    "I think that's the big advantage to moving hives of honey bees. Honey bees are fair, general pollinators, but they make up for their moderate abilities with their sheer numbers. We can move them more easily than we can move other pollinators, and we get that tasty crop of honey off of them."

    This is what makes the honeybee so important to our pollination needs, and is also what overcomes some of their short comings in pollination efficency.

    "Honey bees collecting corn pollen to feed to their larvae isn't a case of pollination; it's just grabbing pollen, not transferring it to another corn plant."

    Correct. And from what I understand, the hive can't efficiently use this type of pollen, so I'm not sure why they gather it, other than maybe there is so much of it available.

    "As far as reading an implication into the AHB statement that included a comparison to GMOs, I wonder if I'm really the only one who sees a link there? If I am, I apologize. I wasn't trying to blow things out of proportion, just trying again to avoid sensationalism."

    Just yanking yer chain.....although I still don't see it............LOL
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    81

    Post

    We have a group of people here in Kansas City called the Fox Hounds... Their logo is "We watch Fox so you don't have to..." I think that sums up how much weight I put into what they say. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Dave

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    South Kingstown, RI
    Posts
    134

    Post

    Yahoo.com headlines have a killer bees found in Florida. Click my yahoo and it will come and link to CNN.com up if your interested in watching. Sorry I couldn't locate a direct link

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    South Kingstown, RI
    Posts
    134

    Post

    Try this link it might get you to the video after a brief commercial

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    South Kingstown, RI
    Posts
    134

  6. #66

    Post

    I just got back from Brazil and have seen these bees in action. Would you believe my first visit to an Apiary, the beekeeper did not wear protective clothing (or his friend, NO SHIRT). I wore my beesuit in 95 degree heat.
    The key to keeping them from attacking is working from the rear of the hive and use LOTS and LOTS of smoke. The 2nd Apiary I visited, I took 3 pictures and got nailed in the forehead.
    My brother inlaw took a shot to the lip and one to the ear. We had to run out of there, with about 50 of the the little darlings chasing us. I never got closer than 10 ft. My brother inlaw said he didnt think Americans could run that fast.
    "To bee or not to bee"

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
    Posts
    48

    Post

    >The key to keeping them from attacking is working from the rear of the hive and use LOTS and LOTS of smoke.

    Yes, LOTS of people do that here. They usually harvest a unique, exotic tar-tasted honey. Maybe they like it.

    I think that's the wrong way. You do it with much less smoke, if you can trust your coveralls. But then you won't be able to get eyebrows up when telling things to the layman . It's true that some colonies need more smoke - sometimes quite more - to be worked, but it's far from necessary in most managements.

    I've contested this practice many times, and I've even quoted an inspired article from Jim Fischer ( Blowin' Smoke) in a faq.
    (But, Jim, don't break out in tears of proud joy too quick - I don't expect more than a handful of beekeepers to care for what I write - and I'm not sure if they can read in English. [img]smile.gif[/img] )

    João

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,610

    Post

    When I briefly had the psycho buckfasts, I found that more smoke seemed to just make them mad. A little always helps, of course, but more isn't necessarily better.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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