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  1. #21
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    Jul 2000
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    NE Calif.
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    Well said Rick!!.I was going to respond ,but then I would have had to just delete my post.
    But I will admit to being 'money hungry'.Probably like anyone else that has a family to feed and bills to pay.I dont have thousands of hives just hundreds, and I depend on them too.Each hive gets moved 4 or 5 times a year.I swear to you Jeff,I wont tolerate mean bees.Bees that pour out of a hive on the peck while being loaded with a boom would be an abomination.Plus I keep these bees VERY close to houses at times(this is Ca.-it cant be avoided)I too am concerned about picking up ahbs,my policy will be extermination of any such bees.I want the drones dead too!
    --Mike

  2. #22
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    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Mike, from what Bob Harrison said on another thread and you say here, we'll want to kill the drones, especially. Maybe they are more of the problem then the queens.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Omaha NE. USA
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    17

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    You children that want to blaim all of the worlds beekeeping woes on commercial beekeepers kii me.
    SUKIE

  4. #24
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    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
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    Mark from what I read ,the AHB drones tend to dominate the matings,so it doesnt make sense to me to try to re-queen such a hive, then allow the drones to remain.I always have large plastic leaf bags in the truck to bag up the rare hive I suspect has aFb(to be burned later),so with some pdb crystals to throw in, the hive is effectively gassed off.I would do it in the morning before the drones are out.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
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    4,074

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    "You children that want to blaim all of the worlds beekeeping woes on commercial beekeepers kii me."

    The one confirmed case of AHB in NY was from a migartory beekeep. So yes they do spread AHB, but so do the hobby beekeeps buying queens and packages from areas with feral populations of AHB. AHB are here, and spreading, so instead of finding blame, lets find a good way to stop them.

    "I want the drones dead too!"

    Considering that drones drift from hive to hive, any ideas as to how to get all of them??
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Omaha NE. USA
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    17

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    How in the world are you ever going to learn to live with AHB if you don't learn to work with it. It will take time to work the gene pool down but it has to be done. I can remember the day the phone rang & our neighbor already had the truck loaded in the south. The test came back for the 1st wave of mites. Then we found the next ones here in Omaha a few years later. Stop them??? Tell me how. There was a effort to stop both mites & that was a bunch of B/S in the purest form. Go ahead stick your head in the sand, running from this problem & pointing fingers fixes nothing. If I still kept bees & opperated as I did 30 years ago I would have been broke 2 times over at least.
    SUKIE

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
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    2,290

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    >Considering that drones drift from hive to hive, any ideas as to how to get all of them??
    No.I wish there was.I guess the best we can do is try to keep them at an insignificant level.And it may work in areas with a real winter.AHBs will always be a problem in the warmer areas, I think.I am sure I will not be keeping bees if ahbs are what we end up with.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    So Sukie, what have you done to adapt your managment practices in regards to AHb?

    I received a reply from Jerry Hayes, in FL. There is quite a lot of info to consume. I'll be interested to see what FL's reaction to AHb is.

    As far as reacting to impending AHb, I don't think that anyone is running from the issue, burying our heads in the sand. We are asking questions and preparing ourselves with knowledge. Sure, we are going to have to get used to this "new pest", but I would maintain that there is and will be a difference between AHb and the other pests that we have dealt with over the past 20 years.

    For one thing, those pests only directly effected us. The AHb problem will effect civilians as well.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,340

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    >Considering that drones drift from hive to hive, any ideas as to how to get all of them??

    Excellent point.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Try to get all of anything. It can't be done. Minimize the situation. Or just accept the inevitable and adapt to it. Or do what you can to keep the majority of drones in your area the desirable kind. Requeen with II queens. Raise queens further north, to stay away from AHb drones and swarms. Trap dones at entrances to hives.

    I don't know. How have other folks adapted managment styles to AHb? How about it CA, TX, AZ, anyone?
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  11. #31
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    Mar 2005
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    Troupsburg, NY
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    "There was a effort to stop both mites & that was a bunch of B/S in the purest form."

    I find most government efforts to stop anything to be what you describe above. The thing is if the government hadn't been messing with AHB's in Bazil to begin with, we wouldn't have this problem. I find that most people have a need to depend on the government to solve their problems so they don't have to put any effort into fixing it themselves. This whole fisco with AHB rest fully on the US Government, and who the idiot was that thought the experiment with AHB's was a good idea to begin with should be..........well, I don't condone voliance so we'll just leave that bee.

    "Go ahead stick your head in the sand, running from this problem & pointing fingers fixes nothing."

    I don't think anyone is sticking their head in the sand. We have generated quite a few usable ideas in the last few months.

    I still think that if we look into areas that have been dealing with AHB's longer than we have that we will find some of the answers we seek. I am not content to sit back for 49 years for things to mellow, as has been suggested by others. The answers are out there, we just need to make a concerted effort to find them, and we can't afford to rely on the government to do it for us.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  12. #32
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    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    That guy, down in Brazil, is long dead.

    He was doing what people have been doing for ages, ever since we started farming and got away from hunting and gathering.

    He was trying to improve the stock in Brazil so that it would be more productive. That's what I heard, anyway.

    Just like the folks who have brought us Buckfast Bees and SMR bees and Russians and any other strain of fruit or vegetable that has been developed over the past, what?, 10,000 years or more?

    You are right, peggjam. We have to educate ourselves to know what others have done, so that their experiences were not in vain.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  13. #33
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    >That guy, down in Brazil, is long dead.

    I don't think so. Not long ago I saw an recent interview. He is 84 now.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warwick_Kerr

    "Dr. Kerr is married to Professor Lygia Sansigolo Kerr and has seven children (Florence, Lucy, Americo, Jacira, Ligia Regina, Tânia and Hélio Augusto) who gave them 17 granchildren. He has as hobbies cultivating native flowers, orchids and fruits."
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
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    Sounds like CNN will be jumping on the "KILLER BEE'S" bandwagon this evening at 7:00 in my area
    yall make some popcorn and tune in
    I'm sure they'll clear this whole mess up for us

    Dave

  15. #35
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    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
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    sqkcrk: I don't know. How have other folks adapted managment styles to AHb? How about it CA, TX, AZ, anyone?
    I just did my first exam of the spring at my home apiary.

    [4] - 5 frame, deep nucs -- all strong and rapidly expanding their brood.

    [1] late-season swarm, hived in 1 medium super -- 6 frames of bees, 3 brood, 2 honey, 1 mostly empty comb with pollen.

    [2] 3 medium supers each with S&SBB, they ended this fall nearly honeybound, about 2/3 of all honey still remains, bottom 2 supers about 1/3 full of brood, bees covering nearly all combs.

    [2] 3 medium supers each with S&SBB, topped with queen excluder and medium super of honey, they ended this fall nearly honeybound, about 2/3 of all honey still remains, bottom 2 supers about 1/3 full of brood, bees covering nearly all combs.

    [1] 25 deep frame hybrid TB/Frame hive, was full of bees and honeybound in fall, but most combs are empty now. 6 central frames are covered with bees, contain brood, honey, and pollen.

    I worked them leisurely and without gloves. Word is I am in the heart of AHB country here in the desert southwest. If they are AHB, they seem vigorous and docile enough to suit my neighbors and I. I received one sting on the right palm, when I accidentally pressured one of the ladies into stinging me.

    I have not used anything to reduce disease and parasites except use some small-cell in most of the hives.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  16. #36
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    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
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    "He was doing what people have been doing for ages, ever since we started farming and got away from hunting and gathering.

    He was trying to improve the stock in Brazil so that it would be more productive. That's what I heard, anyway."

    He was trying to improve it wether it needed it or not. We haven't learned enough from this yet, so lets do some GMO's, and other stuff that really needn't be done. We don't have to worry about terriests, we're GMO'ing ourselves out of exstinst pretty effortlessly by ourselves. As we can see from the AHB experiment, things can go horriably wrong from doing "good" things. It all comes back to the almighty buck.

    "Just like the folks who have brought us Buckfast Bees and SMR bees and Russians"

    This has been done through selective breeding, which usually doesn't harm us.

    "fruit or vegetable that has been developed over the past, what?, 10,000 years or more?"

    It's only the past 15 years or so that really concern me. Anything that is GMO has the potental to be "really bad", as in the case of AHB's we will only know "how bad" in the future, say 10-20 years from now, when it is too late to correct the damage. Seems like AHB should have taught us something, or we are just really slow to learn the lesson.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Omaha NE. USA
    Posts
    17

    Post

    Thanks for your imput Joe! We have had hot bees in the past & you learn to deal with it. If they are to bad we use to kill them. We no longer do this. The reason for this is that left to winter here in nebr more time than you can count they turn out to be no problem the next year. Again I say to you there are a coming learn so adapt. So what are you people going to do when all of the south queen breeding is in AHB????
    SUKIE

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Okay sorry, maybe that was Mark Twain that I was thinking about. My bad.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  19. #39
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    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
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    Peggjam,

    Brother Adam was famous for traveling around the world (including to Africa) to harvest both wild and kept varieties of honeybees. It would not surprise me in the least if both the Buckfast and the SMR selective breeding programs incorperated African genetics.

  20. #40
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    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
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    "Brother Adam was famous for traveling around the world (including to Africa) to harvest both wild and kept varieties of honeybees. It would not surprise me in the least if both the Buckfast and the SMR selective breeding programs incorperated African genetics."

    But...he didn't let them get away...did he???
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

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