Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 121 to 124 of 124

Thread: Honeybee Swarms

  1. #121
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    >And, at the same time, why exactly do bees "dance" then?

    good question. maybe as a scientist, if you find the answer, you might win a nobel prize.

  2. #122
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >why exactly do bees "dance" then?

    Hmm.. I asked that very same question weeks ago. The best answer I got at the time was Bullseye Bill's "They dance because they're happy!" [img]smile.gif[/img]

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  3. #123
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    I just went back and read some of the copyrighted material that was flagrantly posted above :

    It is risky for a young scientist to take on a radical theory. Championing an unproved or unpopular idea is a good way to put your academic career on permanent hold.
    just ask Adrian Wenner about that!

  4. #124
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,790

    Post

    "Championing an unproved or unpopular idea is a good way to put your academic career on permanent hold. "My thesis adviser was worried, too," says Shipman. "He was happy to know that I am beginning collaborations with biologists."" -Adam Frank

    I don't particularly care for that statement about "championing and unproved or unpopular idea. . .." Unproved? First, very few scientists will talk about "proving" things; they tend to talk in terms of "supporting" hypotheses, not "proving" hypotheses.

    And, secondly, what else should graduate students (if you didn't catch it, that's the group that the comment refers to) be doing? Most graduate schools require grad students to conduct "original research." The guidelines might be a little gray, but the idea is to deliberately find ideas (hypotheses) that are "unproven" for research. If grad students (and scientists in general) simply repeated the same experiments over and over, where would that get us?

    The "unpopular" part, well, I can see where young scientists might find their careers put on hold if they attempt to overturn popular hypotheses in favor of unpopular hypotheses.

    But we still get back to the same sets of questions:

    1) Do bees communicate with one another?
    2) Can they convey direction and/or distance information about resources through their communication system?
    3) What sort of communication system do they use if they are capable of conveying such information? Has such a system been observed among bees?
    4) If it's not a "dance language" that bees use (and it certainly could be that bees are using some other form of communication), what's the purpose of the "dances?"

Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads