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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    31

    Smile

    Does anyone have a recipe for Pollen Substitute.
    Happy Beeing

    ------------------
    Richie

  2. #2

    Post

    Why?

    I tried my own using brewer's yeast (expensive) and some kind of flour. Bees did not eat it. What I read aid to add some real pollen from a pollen trap to get the bees to take it. Used some of Mann Lake's stuff this year, no bees went for it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    You put a pollen trap on the hive and freeze the pollen. It works great, the bees love it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Carnation, WA, USA
    Posts
    120

    Post


    My bees are rapidly eating the Mann Lake Bee-Pro patties I put in when I hived them. They're also bringing in lots of real pollen now so I'm not going to replace the Bee-Pro patties when they're finished. I never used pollen substitutes before and just wanted to see what it was like.

    Do you think they're worth it if fed early in the spring before a lot of real pollen is available or is it a waste of money?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159
    >My bees are rapidly eating the Mann Lake Bee-Pro patties

    I have great results with it too. My only caution is to keep an eye on the amount of pollen stored in the comb. I had one hive that got pollen bound before I knew to watch it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    I used the Mann lake patties for the first time this year. They took it as well as they take any patties, which is to say they wasted by far the majority of it.

    I put some dry sustitute (from Brushy Mt.) mixed with real pollen in a small nuc away from the hives and they tore that up. Used it like crazy.

    I would have used more real and less substitue if I had it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,324

    Post

    I make my own from brewers yeast and honey.I fed 3 patties to each hive starting Jan.15.They ate every bit of it and were actually raising drone brood.I look on it as a protein supplement to the natural pollen stored in the hive to make sure the first brood raised isnt deprived of nutrients.I dont use soy flour in the mix and the honey is my own.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Pomfret, MD, USA
    Posts
    242

    Post

    I used Mann Lake bee-pro patties on my newly installed packages. It sat there ignored for two weeks. The bees were bringing in pollen so I decided to remove it before it attracted something else that would eat it.

    I still have a couple patties in the freezer. Next time, I will add some vitamin C per Beewranglers suggestion.

    Kai

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    726

    Post

    I used the dry bee-pro and mixed up patties with corn syrup myself. I was surprised how fast most of the colonies consumed it. Strong hives consumed it in days, and most hives consumed it in a week or so.

    [This message has been edited by tarheit (edited May 14, 2004).]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    31

    Post

    Problem solved, There's a recipe and instructions at http://www.scottishbeekeepers.org.uk.../feeddata9.htm Thanks for all your replies

    ------------------
    Richie

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,502

    Post

    Mann lake patties are expensive!! I switched to a Canadian company, Alberta, called Global Patties, and are almost half the price. It has pollen added, and the bees ate it just as fast.
    I prepaired to make my own, until I found theses guys

    Ian

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Sandhills NC
    Posts
    111

    Post

    When you feed pollen how do you feed it (mixed with something or just plain pollen), when(time of year) and why (to boost brood or when you start a nuc) etc.? Thanks Debbie

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    IMO the only reason to feed pollen is in late winter before the trees start in order to give the bees a week or two head start on brood rearing. Once fresh pollen is available I don't think it does any good to feed them pollen.

    Pollen has been clearly shown in studies to be FAR superior to pollen substitute. The bees rearing on just substitute don't live as long and are not as healthy. Real pollen is best. Next best is half and half. Since I often don't have enough real pollen I do this a lot. I have the best luck putting it in a nuc (to keep it dry) and putting dry pollen mixed with substitute in the box. I have it about 50 yards from the hives and the bees use it a lot.

    Some people make patties. I've made them a lot of times and never had a lot of luck with them. Even when it's real pollen and real honey.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,502

    Post

    I now swear by feeding protien patties in the spring. Not only does it boost the early spring brood rearing a bit, but it also provides the expanding colony some insurance to cold unfaviourable spring weather. It is critical after the bee emerges, that she engorge on a high protien diet a day or so after emergance. It further develops the wings and flight muscles. In a spring like what I am experiencing, where there has been few pollen foraging days, those patties are eaten up readily. When fresh abundant pollen iscomming in, they seem to ignore the patties. So when you see the patties being eaten, you know, that there in not enough pollen comming in to satisfy the bees needs. The patties keeps the queen laying at a reasonable pace, so when better weather comes in, the hives explode into the trees and or flowers. Keep a close watch on the honey stores,..
    They likely do fine without them, but I like to keep my hives strong and well nurished
    Ian

    [This message has been edited by Ian (edited May 16, 2004).]

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    31

    Post

    Ian, Do you make up your own patties? If so ,what ingredients do you use?. The recipe quoted above consist of Soya Flour, Brewers Yeast, and Dried Skimmed Milk. I have read somewhere that by including a crushed Banana (skin included)in the recipe it will prevent Chalk Brood. Thanks for the info.


    ------------------
    Richie

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    My guess is that crushed banana would be a bad idea. Banana is the alarm pheromone and I'm guess it will leave them in an uproar.

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