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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    McGraw,NY,USA
    Posts
    582

    Question

    What is the best/least $ intensive method of
    clarifing honey for the small scale bee keeper?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Hi,

    How many colonies do you have to do this for? or what are you calling small? more info please.

    Clay

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    McGraw,NY,USA
    Posts
    582

    Post

    Hello Clayton....I have 12 Colonies of which 6 will produce a surplus of Honey this year. I would a small producer is less than 30 producing hives?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Hi,

    OK. One more question I forgot to ask the first time. When you say clarify honey do you mean filter/ strain? Or do you mean deal with natural granulation? Sorry for so many questions, just want to answer the right one.

    Clay

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    McGraw,NY,USA
    Posts
    582

    Post

    Clayton;
    I could have been a bit clearer with the original question! When I extract sometimes the honey is cloudy after it has bee filtered. The honey is filtered first with a fine nylon mesh to remove the larger particles and then with a double Knee-high nylon stockings.Not all of the honey is cloudy though?Could it be some pollen that has passsed thru the filters?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    McGraw,NY,USA
    Posts
    582

    Post

    Clayton....also I dont heat my honey other than processing at room temperature.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Hi,

    When extracting air is whipped into the honey and can give the appearance of being cloudy for a few days. Also small particles of wax and pollen will be in the honey doing the same. You must wait till this wax gunk comes to the top of pail (whatever you use) and skim it off. The colder the honey the longer it will take for this to happen. Do you keep your honey in unheated building? Also as you live in NY like me, some honeys will start to naturally granulate at this time in a cold building.

    You will have to heat honey eventually! Especially if you get many colonies. Consider making a hot box for your honey out of an old frige or chest freezer. You can get these for free as many people try to get rid of them. You can place pails, cases of honey, ect to be warmed with little damage to the honey if any. I think this site tells how to make a hot box and a bee culture not too far back tells too! Also bee-l archives explains it also. Also electric pail heaters work too, but you need to pay attention as they COULD damage honey if not watched.

    Where's McGraw located?

    Clay

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    McGraw,NY,USA
    Posts
    582

    Post

    Clayton... Ok I will check out the Hot Box (refridge). What temperature range are you talking about heating the Honey to? Does 100-110 degrees sound appropiate? I have read that around 160 degrees can change to chemistry and alter the taste of the honey.
    My name is Rick Alexander, McGraw is SE of Cortland about 4 miles. I have Cousins in the Cambridge area which might be close to where you are at ?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Galloway Oh
    Posts
    44

    Post

    Try 100-145 degrees, this should kill the yeast spores. however if you let your honey sit a few days, I'll bet a lot of the cloudiness will disappear,

    ------------------
    Tim Gifford

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