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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fairfield, Virginia
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    1,002

    Post

    I am making a yellow jacket trap with the 2ltr bottle, vinegar, sugar,water and a bananna peel. What keeps honeybees from going into one of these?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    The banana peel...The bee's feet aren't smooth.

    Use a small piece of meat for bait. Honeybees aren't carnivorous.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fairfield, Virginia
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    1,002

    Post

    But what about the sweet mixture of the water and sugar?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Kirkland, WA, USA
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    1,020

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    I have several traps and I've never seen a honeybee in one of them. I bait mine with orange juice and tuna fish. This summer I had a problem with so many dead wasps the new ones had trouble drowning.
    http://www.voiceofthehive.com - Tales of Beekeeping and Honeybees

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    East TENNESSEE
    Posts
    100

    Post

    I heard the smell of the bananas is a siginal for the bees to stay away---if you can hear a smell. I've got 4 traps set and haven't caught anything but wasp, yj's, and moths. Never saw a honeybee close to the traps and they're within 5 feet of my colonies..

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    East TENNESSEE
    Posts
    100

    Post

    I heard the smell of the bananas is a siginal for the bees to stay away---if you can hear a smell. I've got 4 traps set and haven't caught anything but wasp, yj's, and moths. Never saw a honeybee close to the traps and they're within 5 feet of my colonies..

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Wink

    I use cheap root beer (the cheaper the better) and smoked turkey breast in mine and maybe just a 'splash' of pancake syrup works great, I've even caught some Bald Face hornets.
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Romney Marsh Kent England UK
    Posts
    292

    Post

    &gt;I heard the smell of the bananas is a signal for the bees to stay away.

    May be this could work for clearing supers at the end of a flow, now this has got me thinking [img]smile.gif[/img]


    Tony

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

    Post

    &gt;&gt;I heard the smell of the bananas is a signal for the bees to stay away.

    &gt;May be this could work for clearing supers at the end of a flow, now this has got me thinking [Smile]

    Or maybe it means stay away unless it is back home, and then it means "predator...mass attack!!!" [img]redface.gif[/img] . I'm not going to try it...that's for sure!

    -rick

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    948

    Post

    We have 5 of the yellow yellow jacket traps set up around our house.
    We bury about 1/2 gallon of them buggers every other day.
    Buy the cheapest tuna fish that you can and put four pinches around the lower, screw on section, but not in the cup.
    Here's some pics:
    http://orsba.proboards27.com/index.c...ead=1155762976
    I have exactly ONE hive more than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond question.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,084

    Post

    I think the vinegar and the banana keep the bees out.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Midland, Michigan
    Posts
    75

    Post

    &gt;&gt;I heard the smell of the bananas is a signal for the bees to stay away.

    ScadsOBees: Or maybe it means stay away unless it is back home, and then itans "predator...mass attack!!!"


    According to the literature, banana oil is a component of the honeybee alarm pheromone. The chemical in question is 3-methylbutylacetate. Synonyms are isoamyl acetate, and isopentyl acetate.

    Wikipedia says, "Isoamyl acetate can be used to attract large groups of honeybees to a small area."

    It appears banana oil might summon honeybees, but not for lunch. I wouldn't use it to clear a super.

    Yellow jackets apparently respond much differently.

    References:

    http://www.tnbeekeepers.org/pubs/Phe...ne%20banana%22

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isoamyl_acetate

    http://www.mainebee.com/articles/nov.php
    David

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    My daughter left a half eaten bananna on the back porch awhile back. Tthe bees were all over it, but looked more like feeding than anything else. I have seen the occasional bee check things out like this before but this bananna was covered.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,084

    Post

    Wow! I've never seen that.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, Va
    Posts
    797

    Post

    I used some syurp from my feed supply contained some wintergreen and lemongrass to top off one of my traps. Within 30 minutes I had about 20 dead honeybees. I quickly emptied that trap and refilled with just the sugar water, BP, and vinegar. It was back to catching just moths,YJs, and yellow European hornets in no time.

    I am also going to test the tuna fish approach (as soon as the monsoon lets up).

    I have also learned to not eat banana on the morning that I am going to work the bees - they do not appear to like the banana breath.
    Bee all you can Bee!
    http://www.hamiltonapiary.net

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Mount Airy, MD
    Posts
    53

    Post

    JohnBeeMan, are you catching many European Hornets in your trap? I'm having alot of them on apple and pear trees and also catching honeybees around my beehives.I don't have a big problem with them eating the fruit, but when they're messing with my bees that's a different story! A couple of weeks ago I declared war on them with a fly swatter and a badminton racket.I've probably eliminated around 175 or so and given many more a good headache! If the yellow jacket trap is really effective, it would sure be a lot easier to use and there would be no chance of getting tennis elbow!..... Also, it would work 24/7 on them. I have gone out after dark and found them eating my pears. After killing the ones I could, I returned an hour or so later to the same pears only to find more of them munching away. If they are actively hunting for food at night, it makes me wonder how much predation is going on at my beehives at night! Anyone else have any experience like this?
    You cannot move a grain of sand upon the beach that you do not effect the entire universe.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    BEEmeister: I've had YJ's desecrate 2 of my hives to the point that when I removed the cover you would have thought I was raising YJ's. They appear to work from the outer frames inward. During the spring they need the honey for their flight muscles and during the fall they need the protein for their brood.
    Some have suggested that there is a symbionic(sp)relationship between their brood, they feed them the bee carcasses and their brood returns the favor with a sweet discharge.
    The cheapest trap to construct is the 2 liter pop bottle one, below the slope cut 4 opposing hole about the size of your little finger, add about 2 inches of cheap root beer (the cheaper the better) and a splash of pan cake syrup, suspend a peice of smoked turkey lunch meat, you can even add some of the rotting fruit, like slices of apples to the mixture. I've had 3 inches of YJ's in a 24 hour period and have even had polistes and bald face hornets in my traps.
    When the trap in full you can just throw it away.

    [size="1"][ October 07, 2006, 12:02 PM: Message edited by: SilverFox ][/size]
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Caledon, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    307

    Post

    David Eyre of Beeworks taught me to take any old jar and use a big nail to punch wasp sized holes in the lid.
    Fill it half full of water and add a couple tablespoons of cheap strawberry jam. Works great.
    Tried several commercially made rigs and none come close. Getting the first one in takes a bit of time but after they sense another wasp inside they fill up. Like mentioned above... full to the point the was not enough water to drown any more.

    When you dump the water and dead wasps, mix a fresh brew and put a doxen fresh dead ones in. Speeds up the " acceptance"

    never had a single honeybee in them. I put one on top / back of each hive to keep them the entrance.

    [size="1"][ October 07, 2006, 01:16 PM: Message edited by: brent.roberts ][/size]
    "hobby farm" is an oxymoron
    Brent Roberts

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Mount Airy, MD
    Posts
    53

    Post

    Thanks SilverFox for the trap instructions.You really do have quite a problem with YJ's.I' ve never experienced anything of that magnitude here. They used to be more of a problem in the fall when you opened a hive. A half dozen or so would be flying in to take some honey. There don't seem to be as many in recent years. I wonder if Vespa crabo may also prey on YJ's in addition to honeybees. Do you have Vespa crabo in Washington?
    You cannot move a grain of sand upon the beach that you do not effect the entire universe.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    Never have seen any up here, but that doesn't mean they're not here. Read the description of them and it seems that they also eat honey bees though.
    When YJ's start attacking it appears that they do as honey bees do when they find a food source, some how the YJ's inform the nest of the location of the hive they are robbing and increase exponentially, one brings back 5-those 5 bring back 20- and so on, till they over come the hive and it happens in a short operiod of time.

    [size="1"][ October 07, 2006, 01:45 PM: Message edited by: SilverFox ][/size]
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

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