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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,371

    Post

    Bees won't (read can't) work red clover. I'm not sure about "crimson" clover.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    I would have sworn that I said in a previous post that I planted crimson clover last year, it bloomed this Spring, and I never saw a bee in it. I must be getting senile at an early stage, lol. Of course, that's just my experience here in Texas, and maybe the bees in your area will work it.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >Anyone, Bueller?????

    Eh, ok...

    Red, crimson, sameo, sameo.
    Flower too long, bees toung too short, won't, don't, can't work.

    Plant Huban, or at least yellow and white for an extended season.



    ------------------
    Bullseye Bill
    Smack dab in the middle of the country.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    i've heard that their is the mammoth red clover that bees can't use,and a medium red clover that they can collect from,not sure about this.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    I've heard the same thing, Hoosierhiver. There is a difference, though, between red clover and crimson clover. The red clovers have a pink flower, and the crimson clover has a crimson red flower that almost looks like a small strawberry sitting on top of the plant during bloom.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Bowling Green, KY USA
    Posts
    52

    Post

    We have a ton of red clover in the pasture across from the house - cattle love, bubble bees love it. Hardly a honey bee there. It is also too long a shaft for the bees to extract nector.

    At this point from responces & more reading, I am looking at purple horse mint & birds foot trefoil for my roadside planting - both plants which will expand natuarally and need little tending.

    Martin

    BTW - TX Bee Guy - you're right, Queenannsrevenge was Black Beards ship - 40 guns of fun, fortunately the ship didn't stay in his command for too long...

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    767

    Cool

    txbeeguy,
    Many thanks for the good advice. I already know that honey bees thrive on crimson clover (but not red clover). An organic farm where I keep 2 hives plants crimson clover as a ground cover, green manure (equal to 100 lbs nitrogen per acre). It blooms in mid April through late May and then drys up and becomes good biomass and mulch for the garden (the farmer removes just enough of it to put in his vegetable plants). The bees work it like crazy and it gives the hives a big boost. I wouldn't recommend it for a roadside planting, but if you have a garden that needs some soil conditioning, then crimson clover is a good choice. Seeds cost about 80 cents/lb and the application rate is 8 lbs per acre. My plan for next year is to follow the crimson clover with Huban (the annual variety of white sweet clover). All of this applies to central NC - I don't know about other places.

    ------------------

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Beulaville, NC
    Posts
    10

    Post

    I vote for Chickory. You might check with your state beekeeping assoc. Ours (NCSBA) has a page on their website specifically called "What's Blooming?" Local info would be your best bet including your state ag ext office, they're a great help.

    Have fun,
    BC

  9. #29

    Smile

    My recommendation for what is worth is to plant white dutch clover/birdsfoot treefoil, and some local late blooming wildflowers. The clover will bloom first, and grow to a heigth of about 18-24 inches, then the birdsfoot treefoil will bloom. Then the wildflowers will give your bees a boost prior to going into winter. With added benefit that they will be able to coexist together. Have Fun

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Bowling Green, KY USA
    Posts
    52

    Question

    On a slightly different train of thought, anyone have magnolia trees? My wife wants one or two, not for the bees, but for the tree. Just curious how the bees like them?

    Martin

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Winchester, VA
    Posts
    8

    Post

    Anyone try planting bee trees, such as tulip poplar, basswood or black locus? I have several acres that I don't want to keep mowing and have considered putting it under trees that would do the honey output good. Experiences, anyone?

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,371

    Post

    I planted sourwood, but the drought killed it. According to Gurney's at the time, it could survive this far north. The tons of sand plums around here ARE the early flow.


  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    767

    Post

    johndl,
    Our main honey flow in the Raleigh, NC area is Tulip Poplar. It makes VERY good honey and lots of it (up to a teaspoon of nectar per blossom). The trees take a long time to become mature enough to bloom and the trees grow to huge sizes.

    ------------------

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hotlanta, GA
    Posts
    475

    Post

    db, I grew up in Raleigh and go back a few times a year. I lived near Creedmoor Crossings for 18 years and left 9 years ago for Atlanta. Love to try and meet up next time I'm down that way.

    With local forage, much blackberry flow those parts?

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    767

    Post

    Branman,
    I live in the Black Horse Run subdivision off of Olde Creedmoor. I'll send you an email about how to contact me next time you're in town.

    There's not enough blackberry to make a surplus.

    ------------------

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Anderson,IN,USA
    Posts
    130

    Question

    Is anyone familiar with "ladino clover"? Planted about 8 lbs of it around a 1/2 acre pond with orchard grass last August. Is it just another variation of the white clover? How does it do as a necter source?
    I have a large oregano cluster (perinial) in my herb garden that the bees just go crazy for, it has tiny white flowers that bloom spring, summer, and early fall. Is this a reliable source of necter or pollen?
    I had purchased a few button bush sapplings at our Indianapolis "bee school" auction and planted them last march around some low lying areas (wet). This button bush hasn't flowered this year but has grown to 2.5' . I was wondering if this actually was a buttonbush because the leaves look very similar to the Hibiscus (rose of sharon) trees I received from a freind and planted in early june.

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