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Thread: Lesson Learned

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    napoleon ohio
    Posts
    769

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    Ok i had a lady ask me if i could take the honey off her hive.I was told her husband passed and she wanted help.So i went looked at the hive 2 deeps 1 med and 2 shallows.I went to take the supers off and wow what a mess.I found 2 of the supers so cross combed it took me most of 2 hours to get the mess off one super was good tho.I get home staring extacting the good frames then see that it was all plain foundation.The lady tell me before I leave with the honey that her husband has been dead for 3 years.Now i find that the honey is most likely 2 or 3 years old.Now the question is I did manage to save 5 gallons of honey,but 2 gallons looks very cloudy and smells like honey from an old hive in a building.The other honey looks ok but is a bit flat tasteing but ok.i plan to take her honey to her in the next few days and explain to her what i pain in the butt this was and half her honey is not all that great.Then invite her and her son out to see how frames and foundation shoud be done. I learned in to much of a soft touch lol and never do this kind of thing again.
    Mitch KD8IMF

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,183

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    3 years without treatment??? Sounds like some good genetics to me.

    See if you can get a few frames of brood next spring and let them raise a queen. Perhaps keep the split there it is isolated at all to insure mating with colony drones.

    Perhaps your good deed will be a good lesson learned.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Oceano, California, USA
    Posts
    467

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    In a lot of those multi-year w/o treatment hives, they have died out every winter and were re-occupied. Sometimes they are full of diseases.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    napoleon ohio
    Posts
    769

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    I left out the fact that another local beekeep had been helping with this hive.I am unclear whitch happend this spring but she said she got a new queen ths son said they got new bees.So no survivor bees.From what i saw of this hive it looks healthy great population i saw no mites in any of the drone bur comb and the 2 brood frames i pulled looked great.It is just the honey has been i the hive a few saesons


    Tim I know what you are saying.I found one such hive while hunting one fall long befor i got into bees.i asked the farmer about it he had no clue as to how long it had been there.The farmer called the agg agent who sent a bee inspector.The farmer then called to tell me the burned the hive for disease control.I have no idea what disease the hive had but from what i know know i am thinking AFB.
    Mitch KD8IMF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Oceano, California, USA
    Posts
    467

    Post

    Yes, Mitch. I'm almost to the point that I don't even try to save hives from buildings, trees etc..for that reason. Especially with the mites, they cause so many feral hives to fall sick will all sorts of things. Swarms of course are another matter, but I pretty much have to quarantine them on account of us being on the front lines of the AHB invasion.

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