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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Lyme, NH, USA
    Posts
    165

    Post

    I'm beginning to understand more about this system of manaagement ( and will order Snelgrave's book soon) but I still have questions:

    How does the use of three deeps eliminate supplemental feedings of syrup and pollen, and yet produce more honey? Do you use any shallow supers, or just deeps?

    Why does a queen excluder reduce the amount of brood? Doesn't the queen just stay in the available deeps, and lay the same number of eggs?

    If you leave three deeps on during the winter, can the cluster produce enough heat to survive in the larger area?

    And, on a completely different topic, what is the difference between this board and the BeeData Bulletin Board?

    Thanks to the many beekeepers who've provided detailed answers to my questions!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Hi,

    How does the use of three deeps eliminate supplemental feedings of syrup and pollen

    reply:

    The bees fill them naturally. You Don't touch their honey as they make theirs first. This insures winter survival and what is surplus is yours.

    and yet produce more honey?

    reply:

    In bad years you won't produce more honey. BUT.....your bees will have food to survive that is natural. Yes you will get surplus just not as much. The reverse is true in good years. All that is happening is that instead of stripping your bees of honey and pollen then replacing it with syrup and pollen sub. you are leaving the real deal there. Also you eliminate most of (if not all)the lugging of feeders and syrup and all that is involved with that.For example if you harvest 80 lbs of honey. Yet you feed back 40 lbs worth in syrup. Did you really make 80 lbs that was surplus? No only 40. This is some of the thought behind this management style. This style of management takes care of the bees first then the beekeeper. You will find that if you do this the bees will in turn take care of you(profit).

    Do you use any shallow supers

    reply:

    Yes, I do. The three brood chambers are deeps so that combs are interchangable. the third deep is often quite full of honey and the queen rarly goes above. Thus I use excluders very sparingly. Shallows are good for cut comb honey too.

    or just deeps?

    reply:

    I use these too! They make they hive very flexible so combs are interchangeable. I will be going more in this direction. What ever the super you want to use use it, its your choice. I like both. Just don't add a third type super size or your will have a frame sizing mess. (note: section supers are fine as they can't be confused)

    Why does a queen excluder reduce the amount of brood?

    reply:

    The answer is in its name it excludes the queen. What happens when the two brood chambers are full of honey pollen and brood? If you had the third available the queen would just keep on laying. Swarm! Swarm! Swarm! Congestion! The queen is restricted with an excluder. Thus less bees as she has no options to lay more brood = less production. Easier to just let her lay and manipulate frame where you what them. Use excluders only when neccessary.

    Doesn't the queen just stay in the available deeps, and lay the same number of eggs?

    reply:

    Yes this would be true, not always. BUT when honey and pollen start filling in these combs she runs out of room quickly. Swarm, congestion! Many queens are quite prolific.An unrestricted queen is better in my POV.

    If you leave three deeps on during the winter, can the cluster produce enough heat to survive in the larger area?

    reply:

    Of course! I live in the Adirondack mountains of NY. Honey is a natural insulator. It has a good R value. Bees only heat what they need not the whole hive. This isn't a problem.

    Clay- keep asking



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