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Thread: ROSS ROUNDS

  1. #1
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Question

    I am interested in selling Ross Rounds next year (counting my honeycomb before it's extruded).
    What has been your experience with them? Where do they sell well? What kind of prices do they run this year?
    How easy is it to use?
    gracias,
    Jason

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
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    Post

    You might want to consider chunck comb. Its a whole heck of a lot easier, and is probably what you want anyway. Cut comb is really nice, ross rounds look odd IMO from a marketting point of view.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    ATL, GA, USA
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    Post

    Ross Rounds are simple to use but they are complicated in that the bees don't particularly like to fill them out completely. You really need to read comb honey booklets before you make the investment. In my experience they have sold very well in my area (metropolitan)and they look very nice. I started out with one super this year and have already put orders for three more. Chunk honey is great too, but I would recommend trying out Ross Rounds.

  4. #4
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    Jun 2003
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    Lakeland FL
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    Post

    I think that I am going to try cut comb next year any tips? I hear that chunk honey will not store very long because it turns to a soilid is this true. thanks

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Post

    Any honey can crystalize, but raw / untreated honey has a higher chance of crystalizing. In many cases that's not a bad thing, many people LOVE crystalized honey. I dont treat my honey at all. Sometimes it crystalizes sometimes it doesn't. I keep some crystalized honey around so I can "seed" some more.

    Its like honey butter, a spread you can put on toast or anythign else you would like a honey butter for.

    Either cut comb or chunk honey has the same chance of crystalizing, except with chunk honey you can treat the honey you are jarring hte comb honey with and therefore can reduce its chances of crystalizing (at least the outside honey).

    I don't like treating my honey because I think it damages the honey. I have neer produced commercial honey, I only ever got enough honey to treat myself, friends and family to some raw honey and/or mead. I am sure honey crystalization can be a bane to commercial beekeepers, but as a hobbiest its a welcome treat on occasion.

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
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    Post

    In my opinion, Ross Rounds are a niche market item. I have some RR supers but have not tried them yet. Hope to try next year. I have heard of one fellow who sold them at a public gardens gift shop for $10 a piece.

    As for the chunk comb honey, I heat the honey to 150 degrees, let it cool then add it to the jar with comb in it. Even then I have noticed a bit of crystallizing in the very bottom of the jar, a year later in a jar I have kept for myself. But maybe the honey was not thorougly heated.

    If you are going to try comb honey you may want to invest in a book like Honey in the Comb by Eugene Killion. I think it covers some principles of what's necessary for success at comb honey production.
    Good luck,
    Denise

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
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    Use the bee journals as a guideline for pricing. I would never tell someone else what to sell at as each area of the country can get a different price. I like them however. I have tried them 2 ways one using the rings in the supers and also without the rings cutting out the sections. Betterbee, in NY sells plastic section trays (round) that work good for use without the rings. These sell better than the RR section containers. However it is much nicer for the beekeepers to use the RR packaging as its cleaner and less labor but a little more costly.

    Clay

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    ATL, GA, USA
    Posts
    70

    Big Grin

    I saw those containers on betterbee and am thinking about ordering some next year. Was it too much of a mess to cut them out?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
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    crown point, NY, USA
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    Its not too bad but it is more time consuming than the RR method where you just trim off foundation slap on covers and label and go. You can use the round section cutter that betterbee sells and cut out of cut comb frames and use the rest for chunk honey if you wanted along with RR sections. With cutting out from the section frames you might rig up a drip tray out of mesh wire (or a fine spaced bakers rack over a pan)or something to allow the edges to drip dry over night then package. This will keep honey from running across the face of the sections if somehow tipped on its side and not ruin the presentation.

    Clay

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Lumberport, WV USA
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    I have tried RR for the first time this year and I feel I was pretty successful. I only had one RR hive body and I got 28 out of 32 filled. About 4-5 of the 28 weren't completely full but they made nice gifts to some of my customers. I am selling them for $5.00 ea. I have already sold over half. I will try another RR next year.

    Dave

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
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    Found them retail in the Austin area for 6.99 each in the HEB Grocery Chain. Definately specialty item as not a lot of honey for the money.

    More likely to see 1 lb. jars with a nice square of comb inserted in the jar and filled with honey. Have seen these at Farm stands for $7, as much comb as the RR with a jar of honey to boot. Imagine the packaging is cheaper than the RR as well.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
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    Post

    Are Ross Rounds recyclible? Might be nice to offer a deposit program where if a consumer returns the Ross Round, you give them back their deposit and maybe sell them some more honey.

  13. #13
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    Yes, that is a good question...are they recyclable?
    Any ideas about where they sell well? I hear that state parks and historical sites are good. WHAT KIND OF DEAL will those places usually offer? Do they get a percentage, do they let you rent the space, do you set it up for free? What is the normal thing to do?
    Jason G in TN

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
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    930

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    Well I wuld think that depends entirely on the park, each park or region has its own program director, they would be the person to contact.

    You might able to swing something, if you maintain and observation hive or two on display at the park, you might be able to sell honey there, and perhaps offer them a small % as donation.

    If you are considering historical societies, than also consider using equipment from that era.

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