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Thread: Ventilation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Pineville, LA
    Posts
    43

    Question

    I live in Louisiana and its very hot and humid here about 99-105 in the summer.
    all I have on my hive is inner cover and I leave the top board proped open with a stick
    is this enough? How do you know if your bees are cool enough?
    I notice about 15 bees in the front of the hive cooling it. This is my second year, first year to get some honey maybe. I will put my super on about march 1st.or a little earlier. Any help Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    You wrote:
    I live in Louisiana and its very hot and humid here about 99-105 in the summer.
    all I have on my hive is inner cover and I leave the top board proped open with a stick
    is this enough? How do you know if your bees are cool enough?

    I notice about 15 bees in the front of the hive cooling it. This is my second year, first year to get some honey maybe. I will put my super on about march 1st.or a little earlier. Any help Thanks

    Reply:
    Sounds like what we go through in Arizona although many beekeepers wouldn't think so.

    Our bees need supering in Feb/Mar with the season coming on and in the summer time from about the middle June until the middle of September the monsoon season comes in and the temperature hits between 99-110 and it feels like you are walking and working in a sauna during el Nino seasons (wet years).

    We too have inner covers and top covers that must be cracked open to help the bees keep cool and also dry the honey coming in.

    Every thing you are doing is proper and fine.We use 3/8inch entrances and crack the top super a pencil width with both the inner cover and top cover. Actually the inner cover is the pencil width back and then the top cover is brought forward over it to keep the rain out like an eave on a house hanging over the sides of the walls built.

    The bees you see on the outside of your hives is normal and very much necessary for the bees to establish a swampcooler effect within the colony. Bees at the bottom will normally fan in and out and bees at the top fan in and out, thus circulating air. Good air in and water laden air out thus cooling the colony and drying the honey.

    The bees will tell you if the situation gets ahead of them for they will hang out on the outside of the supers and stop work during the day. But seldom will you see this happen. Normally you will see it at night with the bees hanging out after the days work is successfully done!!!

    So relax and enjoy your bees.

    Regards,

    Dee A. Lusby

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Marietta, Georgia USA
    Posts
    58
    I am with you on the description of the hot weather. I am in Georgia and it get hot and humid here. Also I would like to ask if any of you ever used piec of cloth instad of innter cover? That what my grand father always used. Durring hot days just cover 3/4 or 1/2 of the top supper with a crack the top cover. Personally I preffer inner cover but sometimes spacially in the spring you running out of them and cloth works great. It also makes a great poroples cloth to use on the infected cuts.

    Andrey.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    I have heard and seen in my life older beekeepers using cloth, but as I remember it was what is called oilcloth or a non-porus cloth like what used to be used for table clothes, etc.

    Never heard of regular cloth and then being used for wounds, but sounds like it would work when later needed. The only problem I would have here is water seeping through during rainstorms.

    Have you found the cloth to be a problem in the during of honey coming in? Any seeping into hives causing mold etc? Always nice to learn how others do things.

    Regards,

    Dee

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Hi All,

    Any of you use burlap for inner covers? Been planning to try it out for a year or two now but just never get aroung to it. On my future project list. But would like to hear if anyone's been using it?

    Clay

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Marietta, Georgia USA
    Posts
    58

    Post

    Dee,
    You are right about type of cloth to be used. About rain and mold I never had this problem. May be because cloth lets the air through very easy and even if it gets wet sometimes it dry's very fast. One thing bees learn quickly is to use top entrance specially during of honey coming. You have to really watch out for that part because if rubbing starts that where is where they will go in.

    Andrey.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Pensacola, Fla
    Posts
    55

    Post

    Dee, Do you use screened bottoms on your hives?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Dee, Do you use screened bottoms on your hives?

    reply:

    I'm not Dee. But I can answer you. She doesn't use screened bottom boards. Just regular bottoms. From talking with Dee, she uses few, if any gizmos or gadjets. Just simple beekeeping equipment.

    Clay

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