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Thread: bee tree

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    johnstown N.Y.
    Posts
    131

    Post

    Hi, I got a call this am from a tree service co. They were taking a tree down and it had a section with a bee hive in it. Well I stapled screen over all the openings and that log is in the bed of my truck. What i plan to do is set it upright brace it so it will stand all winter and if they survuve the winter move them into a hive in the spring Has any one done this with good results, Being this close to winter I don't want to move them into a hive now
    Thanks Dan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,408

    Post

    Yes, I've had good luck doing this, and I think you are approaching it correctly. It is too late in the year to move them into a hive. In the spring, you can smoke and drum them up into a box (if you put a hole in the top of the log if there isn't one already) or you can use bee quick or bee go or whatever to drive them down into a box. (if you put a hole in the bottom and have a lid with a hole in it on the box). Once you get the queen into a box, put board on top of the log with an access hole into the box and an excluder on the bottom of the box and let the bees finish hatching all the brood in the log. You can also flip the log upside down to discourage the bees from using the now misaligned comb. Drawn comb in the box will help a lot so the queen can start laying right away. After three weeks the brood in the log should be have emerged and you can use wire cones, smoke and drum or drive them out of the log (mostly) and then split it down the middle and steal all the honey, or move it a ways away and split it open and let the bees rob it out.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    last year i rescued a feral log hive that was danaged from a tornado and had to be removed,the gum was badly split and there was no way to maintain the bees in this broken gum over the winter.i set up an empty deep with drawn comb,then placed several hive bodies empty of comb on top of the empty hive,i placed all the pieces of the broken gum,bees,brood,etc. inside the empty boxes and planned to leave it till spring.after about a week the bees moved down into the bottom box without any encouragement and did well.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    Dittoes to Michael's reply. I did this two years ago with a colony in an oak that the landowner needed to go away, and this colony continues to be one of my more productive colonies (also one of the meanest.)

    ------------------
    Rob Koss

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