Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Hiram, Northeast Ohio
    Posts
    731

    Post

    Just went up to the edge of the orchard and found that one of my hives was knocked over by a tree that fell in our rain then ice then snow mix of the last couple weeks in N. Ohio. 2 bodies stayed together and the super flew off about 5 feet. The whole thing was burried under 8 inches of snow, must have happened a week ago and sat there on its side with the top and bottom completely exposed through some pretty frigid weather (highs up to 25 and lows around 5. The cluster must have been between the two bodies and remarkably is still intact and alive. Maybe a thousand dead in the super and on the ground, must be a ton of dead in the bodies but I just set it upright and covered it. Anyone have this happen and like the chances for this one to make it?
    It\'s people! Soylent Green is peeeeople!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    I bet it will survive and be a good producer this year. I had one like it last year but mine did not have the benefit of snow cover to protect it. Mine was exposed to freezing drizzle and cold wind. I was able to split as well as make some honey off of it.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    Yes, I have had hives blown over in all sorts of weather. In February of 03 I had a total of 5 hives get blown over during the night. It was around 0F over night. Got them all put back together during the day. They all made it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Hiram, Northeast Ohio
    Posts
    731

    Post

    Thanks guys -- I feel a little better. Amazing what that cluster can do.
    It\'s people! Soylent Green is peeeeople!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    Darrel, I actually have a few pictures on my website of the hives and putting them back together.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Totnes, Devon, England
    Posts
    1,019

    Post

    There's a pattern emerging here - see also my thread 'bee survival story' - of colonies getting exposed to cold and rain and whatnot, and surviving - even thriving despite what should be - according to the books - a deadly experience.

    If this is generally true, then can I suggest that those of us who have had such experiences recently should keep a watchful eye on the colonies in question to see if they turn out to be less than averagely infested with mites, and maybe less than averagely susceptible to diseases during the next season?

    I have an idea that at least some of our troubles are caused by us over-coddling our bees, and maybe a short spell of exposure to adverse condition may turn out to be a Good Thing.
    The Barefoot Beekeeper http://www.biobees.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    A cheap ($4) prevention to hives coming apart for various reasons is a cheap 2" ratchet strap.Quick release/adjustment/re-tensioning, and keeps hives together through amazing knocks...including black bears. I strap mine, and had 7 knocked over at various times during the last year by bears, and they all stayed together.

    BubbaBob

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    san antonio.texas USA
    Posts
    488

    Post

    A few years ago we had a bee yard get hit by a probable tornado. Landlords garage gone, neighbors house destroyed, trees down...you get the picture. We cut our way in the beeyard with a chain saw and recovered all hives except one. Most were just or blown or knocked over, a couple were a fair distance away. Never did find one. I don't remember looseing any of those hives but I think we had a 2 swarm to the trees. I am pretty sure the hive we never found went south and those bees are probably wearing sunglasses, speaking spanish and drinking Coronas.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Benson North Carolina
    Posts
    27

    Post

    When Hurricane Fran blew in, I buckled and tied all of my hives down with tent stakes and rope. I had no problem with them blowing over, but did have a huge tree fall and hit 5 out of 6 hives. I lost everything in the five hives. Crushed all the wooden ware to pieces. Like the Pecans on the trees, I never did find any of the bees.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Post

    >A cheap ($4) prevention to hives coming apart for various reasons is a cheap 2" ratchet strap.

    And it weighs a lot less than the concrete blocks I have on mine. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

    Post

    Beemaninsa,
    I watched the wizard of oz the other day, and can confirm that your bees didn't make it to the south. There it was flying around Dorothy's house like a rocket! And you should have heard those munchkins scream when it finally landed!! [img]redface.gif[/img]

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads