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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Rhea County, Tennessee
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    In the last day or two, I see a few discarded larvae at the hive entrance. They are dark on one end, light on the other. I have never seen this before, any ideas? I have begun antibiotics at this time. Thanks. RB

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    I'd take a look in the brood nest and see what you find. If you don't see any dark or sick brood there and you don't see sunken cappings etc. then I wouldn't worry too much. Brood dies in a dearth it dies when it's chilled and it's chewed out when it's infested with mites and it dies because your inspection damages cells. Sounds like the bees are doing their job by removing it. I haven't used any antibiotics on bees since 1978. I'd make sure you have a problem before you do that. Did you pull the honey first?
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Rhea County, Tennessee
    Posts
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    Thanks for the reply.
    This is a nuc installed with foundation in remaining frames, several weeks ago.
    Most frames all drawn out now, lost of honey being stored, brood looks normal, best I can tell. No signs of FB, any the bees seem vigorous, rather large bees, very long, but not drone size. Minimal drones in hive. Didn't see the queen this time, wasn't really looking for her, though.
    I CAREFULLY inspected all frames, each cell I could see into. In one near-outside frame I found three, what I believe possible to be, hive beetles. About the size of a pencil lead, run like the dickens when you are after them, try to hide in empty cells. Killed 'em, didn't see any more. COuld they be related to the larve looking things I'm seeing being discarded? Looking at the dead larve, they are not nearly the size of a bee, but two or three times the size of the beetle. -Roy

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    wax moth larvae maybe.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
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    Larvae that are black, as if burnt on the tip or head, and white or turning brown at the abdomen, may be sacbrood, or chilled brood. Usually stress realated.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Western Pennsylvania
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    RBar,
    I would also rule out mites, as chewing out is associated with brood in the pupa stage and not larvae stage.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Rhea County, Tennessee
    Posts
    127

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    NatureBee,
    Probably stress, I looked in again, and it is as you said. Dark head and white body. One frame specifically, new comb frame.
    Recently I moved some outside empty frames closser to the middle to stimulate comb on those frames, must have done it too soon.
    Found another (1) beetle today, all other frames appear clear. I'd better stop opening the hive for a while now, and let them fix themselves...right? One last question: think I should tape the seams to help seal it up until they get to it?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
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    This is chilled brood. Sometimes if you move a frame of larvae too far to the outside, if they are not ready to expand, they will abandon it if they have to and re organize the nest. If you are feeding comb to the center, it is better to leave the uncapped somewhere toward the center, and move only the capped outward.

    It is not necessary to tape the seams inbetween the boxes, unless they are wide and you think pests are getting is. Soon, bees will begin propolising the cracks for winter.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,933

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    Is it possible to have chilled brood this time of year? The temps. across TN have been in the high 80's every day since the heat wave which was hotter. Dosen't really cool down much at night either unless your in the mountains. Is chilled brood not necessarily associated with temperatures?

    RBar where in TN are you at? I haven't heard much about hive bettles around the Knoxville area, yet.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Springfield New Jersey
    Posts
    119

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    could be chalk brood caused by excessive moisture

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
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    > Is it possible to have chilled brood this time of year?

    Yes! The optimum brood temperature is about 95F. If there are insufficient bees to maintain this temperature, the brood will chill and die. It can be a result of mistreatment of the bees by the beekeeper. It also can be caused by a pesticide hit that primarily kills off the adult population, or by a sudden drop in temperature during rapid spring buildup. It can happen at 70F while you are holding a frame of brood outside the hive too long. Brood must be kept warm at all times.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
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    1,649

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    I don't have problems with chilled brood in summer and I live in ALASKA! FWIW [img]tongue.gif[/img]

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Western Pennsylvania
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    It is not required that it be 'chilly' to have a case of chilled brood. Brood that is under fed can cause chilled brood. I would guess that in many cases, chilled brood is the result of mistreatment of the bees by the beekeeper, and to a lesser degree weather related.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    >could be chalk brood caused by excessive moisture

    Yes
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Rhea County, Tennessee
    Posts
    127

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    MichaelW:
    The, what I believe to be, hive beetles came with the NUC I bought from a Knoxville apiary, one of the links listed in the links page off BeeSource.-Roy

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
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    RBar,

    Oh, I was trying to buy some queens from a guy in Knoxville. I think it fell through. I think its a matter of time before the bettles can handle our winters, I hope I'm wrong. Hopefully, the winters and soil conditions will keep the bettles at low numbers in our area and not require yet another pest treatment.
    Or perhaps I'm out of touch and they are already common. Haven't seen them here yet. I wan't to expand but am planning on only buying queens, beetles are one reason.

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