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Thread: weight of...?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,384

    Post

    Full of honey
    Deep = 90 lbs
    Medium = 60 lbs
    Shallow = 50 lbs
    8 frame medium box (with either 7 or 8 frames in it) = 48 lbs.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
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    Greetings . . .

    Just removed two shallows supers . . .
    One w/ TEN frames weighed 45 lbs.
    One w/ NINE frames weighed 46 lbs.

    After scraping off honey and leaving "wet" foundation . . . each weighed 12 lbs.

    My deep "food chamber" must weigh 500 lbs [img]smile.gif[/img]

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

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    So Dave, you're saying Nine Frames is less work, less equipment, less extracting and more honey.

    Hmmmm.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    133

    Post

    Hawk,

    I use 9 frames with the spacers in my supers. A lot of beeks do around here. They pull the comb out further and you really do get as much if not more honey. Plus it works perfectly in the 9 frame radial.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
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    2,068

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    >>So Dave, you're saying Nine Frames is less work, less equipment, less extracting and more honey.

    I'm not Dave but I heard from a beekeeper who claims he gets more honey from spacing his frames 8 to a super.

    Dan
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bismarck, ND USA
    Posts
    512

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    I have used 9 frames in supers in the past and currently use 8; I think it's about a wash in terms of honey, but the frames are even easier to uncap with only 8 in a box.
    Gregg Stewart

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,068

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    Gregg,

    I'm assuming that you also get more honey mixed with your cappings this way? I plan on switching to 8 frames to the super.

    Dan
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bismarck, ND USA
    Posts
    512

    Post

    Yes, I would say so. I have a chain-flail type uncapper and the honey-cappings fall into a wax melter-separator. I try to keep the uncapper adjusted so it doesn't rip into the comb very much (so hopefully not as much honey is going into the melter with the cappings, but also have to do more scratching on low parts of the comb). If I had a spinner of adequate size I wouldn't worry about it as much as all the honey could be recovered faster.
    Gregg Stewart

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,384

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    I agree a nine frame spaced ten frame box full of honey weighs virtually the same as ten frames in the same box.

    I've seldom done eight, but maybe I should do it more often. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
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    Greetings . . . Robert Hawkins,

    Yep! Just a "tadd" [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Had read this claim in several books but . . .
    most of what we read (in books) seems a bit different from "actual experience". [img]smile.gif[/img]

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