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Thread: weight of...?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Gilroy, CA
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    I am like obsessed with beekeeping right now and ive been thinking about next season. I was thinking about going deeps all the way but I have a question, how much on average does a deep full of capped honey weigh? I lift 50 pound boxes for my dads buisness everyday so im used to lifting, but ive heard it may go over 65lbs for a deep??

    Thanks
    Danny
    Happiness is something final and complete in itself, as being the aim and end of all practical activities whatever .... Happiness then we define as the active exercise of the mind in conformity with perfect goodness or virtue.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hotlanta, GA
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    80-90lbs comes to mind, but I'm not exactly sure, but they're HEAVY...I'm 28 and in good shape, but my back is invariably sore after having to carry them any distance
    Ask two beekeepers, get three answers

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
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    Good guess, man. It's 80-90 pounds. The reason I'm in the process of moving to mediums.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Milford, MI
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    Deep frames full of honey weigh between 9 and 12 lbs. each. Many of our deeps weigh 120 lbs. including the box.

    If you don't have a strong back or know how to lift properly with your legs instead of your back, forgeddit.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Oregon
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    90 almost does sound light for a deep, but it's sure heavy and the angle that it all happens and the bees all around, don't drop it!

    the trick is to just not use shallows.

    well, shallows make GREAT rims and feeders! [img]smile.gif[/img]

    i'm happy with my setup of 2 deep, 2 medium hives
    \"You\'ve got to stop beating up your women because you can\'t find a job, because you didn\'t want to get an education and now you\'re (earning) minimum wage.\"<br /><br />-Bill Cosby

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Milford, MI
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    Deep frames full of honey weigh between 9 and 12 lbs. each. Many of our deeps weigh 120 lbs. including the box.

    If you don't have a strong back or know how to lift properly with your legs instead of your back, forgeddit.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bismarck, ND USA
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    Think 120 lbs. is stretching it, 80 - 90 lbs. is about right if they're pretty full of honey. Worked 1 Summer for a commercial outfit that used mostly deeps for honey supers, and it is no fun pulling deeps of honey all day, every day. Used deeps in my own operation when I first started, but as I got more hives used the deeps for brood chambers and only use mediums for honey supers now.
    Gregg Stewart

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Oregon
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    233

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    got your 8 frame spacer out? [img]smile.gif[/img]

    either way, its way too heavy!

    deeps for brood, mediums for honey [img]smile.gif[/img]
    \"You\'ve got to stop beating up your women because you can\'t find a job, because you didn\'t want to get an education and now you\'re (earning) minimum wage.\"<br /><br />-Bill Cosby

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Milford, MI
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    Did I studder, or say I think they weigh 120 lbs? I'm telling you what my calibrated scale reads. [img]tongue.gif[/img]

    Maybe the gravitational force is less in North Dakota, giving the impression that honey, frames and equipment is lighter. I wish I lived there, maybe I'd only weigh 200 lbs.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Omaha, NE
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    256

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    Most deeps will average 80-90 lbs when full. If they all weighed 120 more then likely I would be in a world of hurt, most of our honey supers are deeps. That and it also depends on whether or not the supers are white comb vs old dark comb brood nests if that is the case the darker comb will add signifigant weight.
    AKA BEEMAN800

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
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    First one harvested---90
    second 100
    third 110
    twentieth 220
    ETC-ETC-ETC

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    I heard the other day there are 2 kinds of beekeepers. Those that have a bad back and those who are going to!

    I wish I had started with all 8 frame mediums. What I have is 1 deep 2 mediums for a basic hive.

    Dickm

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
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    &gt;First one harvested---90
    &gt;second 100

    Correct! I have discovered this mystery already even with my limited experience beekeeping. Deeps actually get progressively heavier, the more you have. The first one full of honey will weigh around 90 pounds, but very quickly you'll discover they are in fact too heavy to lift.

    Mediums are bad enough. Full shallow supers when they're around head-height weigh almost as much as a deep on the ground.

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hotlanta, GA
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    475

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    I hear ya, dickm...I really wish I started with 8 frames boxes...

    ATTN NEW BKERS: Seriously consider starting with 8 frame equipment...you'll thank us later
    Ask two beekeepers, get three answers

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Enfield,Ct.
    Posts
    469

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    I wish I had shallow supers at head height.

    Full of course.

    How many would that be? 5 or 6?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Minnesota, USA
    Posts
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    Obvious consensus -- a deep full of honey is too heavy for mere mortals.

    Now the question is whether using 100% mediums is the best plan. I sure like the appeal of having only one kind of super. On the other hand, it's somewhat of a pain to have to inspect three supers of brood instead of two. I have both configurations, and can argue it either way.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Trumbull, CT
    Posts
    406

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    I'm going with all deeps. I have 2 deeps on now and like the consistency. All I have to do is pick it up and put it in a wheelbarrow next to the hive. If itÂ’s too heavy I can always take a few frames out.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Oregon
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    oi.
    \"You\'ve got to stop beating up your women because you can\'t find a job, because you didn\'t want to get an education and now you\'re (earning) minimum wage.\"<br /><br />-Bill Cosby

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    1,966

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    Bee bear,
    I like your approach. That way you can argue with yourself. I did that and came out with 1 deep and 2 mediums. If I have to reverse, it's not too bad as brood is lighter than honey. By fall the deep is on the bottom.
    Lead pipe,
    The backyard beekeepers club is within striking distance for you. We meet in Weston. Backyardbeekeepers.com will give you more data.

    Dickm

  20. #20
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Trumbull, CT
    Posts
    406

    Post

    I joined 2 weeks ago, havent been to a meeting yet. Hope meet you soon..

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